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ADDISONIA 

COLORED ILLUSTRATIONS 

AND 

POPULAR DESCRIPTIONS 

OP 

PLANTS 



Volume 3 
1918 




BOTA' 3CAL 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN 
(ADDISON BROWN FUND) 






PRESS OF 

THE NEW ERA PRINTINQ COMPANY 

LANCASTER, PA. 



m 



CONTENTS 
Part 1 



March 30, 1918 
platb pagb 

81 Aronia atropurpurea 1 

82 Aster Novae-Angliae 3 

83A Gymnocalycium multiflorum 5 

83B Gymnocalycium Mostii 5 

84 Euonymus alata 7 

85 Diospyros virginiana 9 

86 Lepadena marginata 11 

87 Maackia amurensis Buergeri 13 

88 Hibiscus oculiroseus 15 

89 Comus ofl&cinalis 17 

90 Opuntia lasiacantha 19 

Part 2 
June 29, 1918 

91 Cotoneaster Simonsii 21 

92 Echeveria nodulosa 23 

93 Helianthus orgyalis 25 

94 Symphoricarpos albus laevigatus 27 

95 Sinningia speciosa 29 

96 Stylophorum diphyllum 31 

97 Aronia arbutifolia 33 

98 Hamamelis japonica 35 

99 Hibiscus Moscheutos 37 

100 Sobralia sessilis 39 

Part 3 

September 30, 1918 

101 Comus Mas 41 

102 Solidago squarrosa 43 

103 Callicarpa japonica 45 

104 Aster laevis 47 

105 Opuntia Opuntia .49 

106 Ilex serrata argutidens 51 

107 Othonna crassifolia 53 

108 Magnolia Kobus 55 

109 Crassula portulacea 57 

110 Viburnum prunifolium 59 

«•• 

lU 



iv Addisonia 

Part 4 



December 31, 1918 



111 Symphoricarpos Symphoricarpos 61 

112 Spiraea Thunbergii 63 j 

113 Coreopsis Leavenworthii 65 

114 Echinacea purpurea 67 

115 Lantana depressa 69 ; 

116 Ilex verticillata 71 j 

117 Vioma Baldwinii 73 ] 

118 Jussiaea peruviana 75 i 

119 Salvia farinacea 77 i 

120 Dianthera crassifolia 79 i 

Index 81 i 



1 



ADDISONIA 



COLORED ILLUSTRATIONS 

AND 

POPULAR DESCRIPTIONS 

OF 

PLANTS 



Volume 3 Number i 

MARCH, 1918 




PUBLISHED BY 



ti 



THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN ^ 

(ADDISON BROWN FUND) 1 

MARCH 30, 1918 i 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



A bequest made to the New York Botanical Garden by its late 
President, Judge Addison Brown, established the 

ADDISON BROWN FUND 

"the income and accumulations from which shall be applied to the 
founding and publication, as soon as practicable, and to the 
maintenance (aided by subscriptions therefor), of a high-class 
magazine bearing my name, devoted exclusively to the illustration 
by colored plates of the plants of the United States and its terri- 
torial possessions, and of other plants flowering in said Garden or 
its conservatories; with suitable descriptions in popular language, 
and any desirable notes and synonomy, and a brief statement 
of the known properties and uses of the plants illustrated." 

The preparation and publication of the work have been referred 
to Dr. John H. Barnhart, Bibliographer, and Mr. George V. Nash, 
Head Gardener. 

Addisonia is published as a quarterly magazine, in March, June, 
September, and December. Each part consists of ten colored plates 
with accompanying letterpress. The subscription price is $10 
annually, four parts constituting a volume. The parts will not 
be sold separately. 

Address : 

THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN 
BRONX PARK 

NEW YORK CITY 

Subscribers are advised to bind each volume of ADDISONIA as 
completed, in order to avoid possible loss or misplacement of the parts; 
nearly the whole remainder of the edition of Volumes 1 and 2 has 
been made up into complete volumes, and but few separate parts 
can be supplied. New subscriptions will be accepted only as includ- 
ing the first volumes. 



PLATE 81 



ADDISONIA 




ARONIA ATROPURPUREA 



Addisonia 1 

(Plate 81) 

ARONIA ATROPURPUREA 

Purple-fruited Choke-berry 

Native of eastern North America 
Family Mai^aceab Appl^ Family 

Aronia atropurpurea Britton, Manual 517. 1901. 

Pyrus arbutifolia atropurpurea Robinson, Rhodora 10: 33. 1908. 

Pyrus atropurpurea L. H. Bailey, Rhodora 18: 154, 1916. 

An irregularly branching shrub, reaching a maximum height of 
about twelve feet, usually lower, commonly about seven feet high. 
The young twigs are slender; the bark of old stems is smooth and 
dark grey. The winter-buds are narrow, sharp-pointed, and about 
one quarter of an inch long. The leaves unfold in early spring and 
fall in late autumn; the blades are oval to obovate, from one inch to 
three inches long, about one inch wide or less, pinnately veined, finely 
and rather sharply toothed, moderately thin in texture; the apex is 
either acute or blunt, the base narrowed, and the petiole is much 
shorter than the blade, seldom over one quarter of an inch in length; 
the upper surface of the blade is dull green and smooth or nearly so, 
the midvein bearing small glands; the lower surface is persistently 
whitish- wooUy ; the small, narrow stipules fall away very soon after 
the leaves unfold. The flowers are borne in terminal, more or less 
compound, woolly cymes, and open, according to latitude, in April, 
May, or June, soon after the leaves unfold; their pedicels are short 
and woolly. The small, urn-shaped, woolly calyx has five acute 
lobes which are glandless or bear a few glands; there are five, obovate, 
obtuse, concave, spreading white petals one sixth to one quarter of 
an inch long. The numerous stamens are much shorter than the 
petalsj with filiform filaments and very small anthers. 

This shrub inhabits wet woods and thickets in eastern North 
America, ranging from eastern Canada to Ontario, Michigan, and 
southward to Virginia, perhaps to Florida. It grows readily when 
planted in dry ground, even with full exposure to the sim, but does 
not become as tall under these conditions as when in its more nattural 
habitat of wet thickets; it is attractive and interesting both in flower 
and m fruit. 

The genus Aronia, established by Medicus in 1789 (Phil. Bot. 140), 
is composed of but three species, all natives of eastern North America 
and closely related to each other. The typical species is Aronia 
arbutifolia, the red choke-berry, which, like A. atropurpurea, has 
woolly under leaf-surfaces, but its fruit is bright red and only 
about a quarter of an inch in diameter, and its flowers have very 



2 Addisonia 

glandular calyx-lobes; with us, the red choke-berry does not succeed 
well in cultivation in the open, seldom becoming over four feet high, 
and not appearing anything like as vigorous as A. atropurpurea 
when growing alongside of it; the red fruits persist on the shrub well 
into the winter. The third species, Aronia nielanocarpa, the black 
choke-berry, dififers from both the others in having glabrous leaves, 
twigs, and cymes, and its black or nearly black fruit, a quarter to a 
third of an inch in diameter, falls in the autumn; its stems and 
branches are nearly straight and upright. 

The foregoing obsen^ations upon these shrubs have been made 
from plants in the fruticetum of the New York Botanical Garden. 
The plants from which our illustrations were obtained were grown 
from seed collected on Staten Island, New York, in 1896, near the 
type locality at Tottenville. 

N. L. Brixton. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Frmting branch. Fig. 2. — Flowering 
branch. 



PLATE 82 



ADDISONIA 




Aj L LCtHni^ 



ASTER NOVAE-ANGLIAE 



Addisonia 3 

(Plate 82) 

ASTER NOVAE-ANGLIAE 
New England Aster 

Native of the eastern and middle United States and Canada 
Family Carduac^ar Thisti,^ Family 

Aster Novae-Angliae L. Sp. PL 875. 1753. 

A stout, tall, large representative of the genus, sometimes growing 
to a height of six or eight feet. The stiff robust stems are rough- 
hispid, more or less corymbosely branched above and conspicuously 
leafy throughout. The rough-pubescent leaves are entire-margined» 
up to five inches long and an inch wide, lanceolate-cordate in shape, 
and clasp the stem and branches with their cordate or auriculate 
bases. The flower-heads are clustered at the ends of the branches. 
The involucre is green, pubescent, and more or less glandular and 
viscid. The rays, forty to fifty in each flower-head, are a half to 
nearly three quarters of an inch long, normally pmple or violet- 
colored, rarely pink, red, or white. 

This is one of the connnonest of the two hundred and fifty or more 
recognized species of the genus Aster, of which about one hundred 
and fifty are native to North America. Its range may be roughly 
designated as within the region lying south from Quebec and Sas- 
katchewan, east from Colorado, and north from Alabama and South 
Carolina. It grows in both dry and wet locations, and is usually a 
conspicuous floral featine of late summer and early autumn, especially 
along roadsides, fences, and borders of woods. For interior decor- 
ative purposes it is disappointing, as, unlike most of the blue and 
purple asters, it is sensitive to handling and wilts very quickly. 
Except for the red and white color-forms, the species does not vary 
from the normal type, and there is no difficulty in recognizing it, and 
no possibility of confusing it with any other. 

Arthur Hoi,uck. 

Explanation of Pirate. Fig. 1.— Flowering stem. Fig. 2.— Involucre, X 2. 



PLATE 83 



ADDISONIA 




A. GYMNOCALYCIUM MULTIFLORUM 



.^TN 




B. GYMNOCALYCIUM MOSTII 



Addisonia S 

(Plate 83) 

A. GYMNOCALYCIUM MULTIFLORUM 
Many-flowered Gymnocalycium 

Native oj Argentina 
Family Cactacea^ Cactus Family 

Echinocactus muUiflorus Hook. Bot. Mag. pi. 4181. 1846. 
Gymnocalycium muUiflorum Britton & Rose. 

Plants solitary" or growing in clumps up to 10 individuals, each one 
and one half to five inches in diameter, usually globose but sometimes 
depressed or short-cylindric. The ribs are ten to fifteen, broad and 
rounded, with low tubercles, each with a small chin below its spine- 
cluster; the areoles are only a few to each rib, elliptic, sometimes 
two fifths of an inch long; the spines are five to ten in a cluster, all 
radial, yellow, sometimes brownish or reddish at base, subulate, 
spreading, often recurved, the longest sometimes over an inch long. 
The flower-bud is ovoid, and covered with imbricate scales; the 
expanded flowers are short-campanulate, pinkish to nearly white; 
the scales on the calyx-tube are broad, rounded, naked in their axils. 
The stamens and style are included; the stigma-lobes are white, 
linear. 

The plant here illustrated is a small specimen received from the 
Berlin botanical garden in 1901, which flowered in the New York 
Botanical Garden, June 1, 1913. The cluster of spines is from a 
specimen collected by J. N. Rose in Argentina in 1915. The species 
has been reported from Brazil and other South American countries, 
but is doubtless restricted to northern central Argentina, where the 
writer collected it on the high grassy plains of Cordoba in 1915. 

J. N. Rose. 

Explanation op Platr. Fig. 1. — Flowering plant. Fig. 2. — Portion of a 
rib, showing an areole and a cluster of spines. 

B. GYMNOCALYCIUM MOSXn 
Most's Gymnocalycium 

Native oj Argentina 
Family Cactaceab Cactus Family 

'Echinocactus Moslii Giirke, Monatsschr. Kakteenk. 16: 11. 1906. 
Gymnocalycium Mostii Britton & Rose. 

Plants solitary, one and one half to three inches high, five inches 
or less in diameter. The ribs are nine to fourteen, broad and obtuse; 



6 Addisonia 

the tubercles are rounded, with a small sharp chin below the spine- 
duster; the small areoles are circular; the brownish spines are slender 
and subulate, the seven to nine radial ones spreading, the central 
one solitar}'. The flowers are central, bell-shaped, about tliree inches 
long, pale red to pinkish white; the scales on the calyx-tube are few. 

The plant here illustrated is a small one collected by J. N. Rose at 
CassafiFousth, Cordoba, Argentina, in 1915, which flowered in the 
New York Botanical Garden, June 16, 1917. Its native habitat is 
on dry hills under low bushes. 

The genus Gymnocalycium, to which the two species here illus- 
trated belong, appeared first in the catalogue of A. Schelhase's garden 
at Kassel in 1843, but was not formally published until 1845 when 
Pfeifi'er referred to it three species; the following year he illustrated 
one of these. Although Dr. Ludwig Pfeiffer was the most distin- 
guished cactologist of his time, this genus has heretofore not been 
accepted, nor have the species of which it is composed ever been 
brought together even as a sub-genus. Schumann has treated the 
species known to him in his subtribe Notocactus, but in this tribe he 
has included other species which are not closely related to Gymnocaly- 
cium. The genus has no close relatives in South America, being very 
unlike Malacocarpus and Discocarpus of that region. In its flowers 
it resembles some of the Mexican species referred to Echinocactus, 
but is very unhke the true species of that genus. 

The species of Gymnocalycium are among the most satisfactory cacti 
for greenhouse cultivation, for they grow well under glass and fre- 
quently flower. They are day bloomers and the flowers last for 
several days. The genus contains about twenty-three species, and 
is confined to southern South America east of the Andes. BoUvia, 
Paraguay, and Uruguay, have each two or three species, the re- 
mainder being found in the plains and mountain valleys of Argentina. 
Most of them are small, usually simple plants, but sometimes they 
are cespitose, with few broad somewhat tubercled ribs. The flowers 
are central or rarely lateral, with a more or less definite tube, bearing 
a few scattered broad scales, and these always naked in their axils; 
the seeds are dome-shaped and tuberculate. 

J. N. Rose. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering plant. Fig. 2. — Portion of a 
rib, showing an areole and a cluster of spines. 



PLATE 84 



ADDISONIA 




• 



*j4i^ 





Lied 



Oi 



EUONYMUS ALATA 



Addisonia 7 

(Plate 84) 

EUONYMUS ALATA 
Winged Euonymus 

Native of eastern temperate Asia 

Family Celastracea^ Staff-trbE Family 

ICelastrus striatus Thunb. Fl. Jap. 98. 1784. 

Celastrus alatus Thunb. FI. Jap. 98. 1784. 

Euonymus Thunbergiana Blume, Bijd. Fl. Ned. Ind. 1147. 1826. 

Euonymus alata Thunb.; Regel, Mem. Acad. St.-Petersb. VII. 4*: 42. 1861. 

A handsome shrub, dense in habit and freely branching, with 
attractive fohage, tm-ning rich crimson in autumn, and with numerous 
flowers in the summer, followed in the fall by a profusion of bright 
red fruits which persist for a long time. The branches are ascending, 
with four prominent corky dark-colored wings, which are especially 
conspicuous during the winter when the foliage is gone. At flower- 
ing time the glabrous growths of the year rarely have these wings, 
but they are usually developed with the maturing of the fruit. The 
leaves are opposite, on stalks an eighth of an inch long or less, elliptic 
to obovate, abruptly acuminate, glabrous, a Httle paler beneath; 
they measure an inch to two inches long and up to an inch wide, and 
their margins are rather closely and finely serrate. The flowers, the 
general appearance of which is a yellowish-green, are from one third 
to one half an inch in diameter, and are borne, usually in threes, in 
axillary cymes; the parts are in fotus. The sepals are very short, 
much broader than long. The petals are orbicular or nearly so, an 
eighth of an inch long or a little more, obtuse or sometimes rather 
apiculate; their margins are entire or somewhat crenulate. The 
stamens are very short, inserted on a disk. The style is very short. 
The purplish capsule is often of a single carpel, or sometimes of two to 
fom- carpels, in which case one or more are commonly abortive; the 
dehiscing carpel discloses a bright orange-red aril which encloses a 
brown seed, or rarely two seeds. 

This, one of the best of all omr decorative shrubs, grows native in 
Japan, Manchuria, the Amur region, and in north and central China. 
It is one of the shrubs easy to grow, accommodating itself readily to 
its surroundings, and is a thing of beauty in summer and winter. 
Its crisp fresh foliage gives it a dainty appearance in the month of 
May, when its flowers usually appear. As the season advances the 
leaves become of a grayer hue, and in the autumn turn to a rich 
crimson, which, with the bright orange-red of the exposed arils, makes 
it one of the most conspicuous shrubs of that season. As the leaves 
fall the bright red fruit appears even more conspicuous, and the 



8 Addisonia 

corky wings, of a brown color, become more evident, adding a curious 
as well as attractive touch not seen in other shrubs. It may be rea dily 
propagated from seeds. The illustration was prepared from a bush 
which has been in the collections of the New York Botanical Garden 
since 1905. 

The genus Euony^nus contains about one hundred and twenty 
known species, distributed in the northern hemisphere, mainly in the 
central and eastern portions of Asia, with a few in southern Asia and 
Aui.tralia; in the United States there are but five or six species. 

George V. Nash. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Fruiting branch. Fig. 2. — Seed, X 2. 
Fig. 3. — Part of a flowering branch. Fig. 4. — Flower, X 4. 



PLATE 85 



ADDISONIA 




DIOSPYROS VIRGINIANA 



Addisonia ^ 

(Plate 85) 



DIOSPYROS VIRGINIANA 
Persimmon 

Native of the eastern United States 
Family EbEnaceaE Kbony Family 

Diospyros virginiana L. Sp. PI. 1057, 1753. 
Diospyros concolor Moench, Meth. 470. 1791. 
Diospyros pubescens Pursh, Fl. Am. Sept. 265. 1814. 

A small or large tree, or sometimes a shrub, with spreading gray 
branches, the twigs reddish-brown and glabrous or sometimes ob- 
scurely pubescent. The bark of the trunk is deep brown or nearly 
black and ultimately broken into small blocks. The sap-wood is 
close-grained, hard, heavy; the heart- wood develops only when the 
tree is of great age and is dark brown or nearly black. The leaves 
are alternate, deciduous, short-petioled, with ehiptic or oval, varying 
to ovate, thin, leathery blades, two to six inches long, acute or 
short-acuminate, entire, shining and deep-green above, paler and 
dull beneath, glabrous or sometimes finely pubescent, especially 
beneath, acute, obtuse, or cordate at the base. The flowers are 
usually staminate or pistillate, solitary or few together in cymes, 
short-stalked. The calyx is four-lobed, that of the staminate flower 
with lanceolate to deltoid lobes; that of the pistillate flower is much 
larger, persistent, accrescent, with orbicular-deltoid lobes. The 
corolla is white or pinkish, or sometimes greenish yehow, urceolate, 
about twice as long as the calyx, that of the pistillate flower larger than 
that of the staminate, with four reniform recurved lobes. The sta- 
mens, usually sixteen, are included, and commonly borne in two rows 
on the lower part of the corolla-tube; their filaments are very short 
and each one supports an erect narrow elongate anther, the anthers 
of the inner row usually bearded at the base, those of the outer row 
shghtly larger than those of the inner; the stamens in the pistillate 
flower are represented by staminodia with short stalks and lanceolate- 
sagittate bodies. The ovary is sessile, depressed-globose, glabrous 
and surmounted by four slender styles, each of which is terminated 
by an inconspicuous stigma. The berries are usually sohtary, 
globose, varying to depressed or elongate, thin-skinned, pale yehow to 
orange or often reddish brown southward, seated on the accrescent 
calyx, the diameter of which is usually less than the diameter of the 
berry; the flesh, hard and exceedingly astringent when green, is soft 
and yehowish and very sweet when mature. The seeds are flat, 
elliptic or slightly narrowed upward, arranged in a whorl around the 
axis of the berry, brown, usually shining, but slightly roughened. 

The geographic range of the persimmon in North America extends 
naturally from Connecticut to Iowa and southward to the Gulf of 



10 Addisonia 

Mexico. The plant thrives equally well from near sea level to several 
thousand feet altitude, and grows both on dry hillsides and in swamps. 
However, it prefers moderately moist soil, growing both in woods 
and in the open, where, especially in old fields, it often forms thickets 
as a result of its stolonifcrous habit. The persimmon grows naturally 
in the vicinity of the New York Botanical Garden. The accompany- 
ing illustration was made from trees planted in the Garden. 

The common persimmon, also known popularly as date-plum, 
possum-wood, and 'simmon, has some relatives in the West Indies, 
but the genus is most abundantly developed in Asia, where the heart- 
wood of several species furnishes the well-known ebony of commerce. 

The history of the persimmon begins in the earlier part of the cen- 
tury following the discovery of the New World, and the tree was 
introduced into European gardens in the earlier part of the seventeenth 
century, if not previous to it. It was apparently first mentioned in 
print about the middle of the sixteenth century in an account of De 
Soto's expedition in Florida, and after that there appeared numerous 
descriptions of the persimmon in European literature. 

On account of its beauty and adaptability to various soils, and also 
because of its resistance to disease and immunity from disfiguring 
insects, the persimmon is a tree desirable for ornament. The deep- 
green glossy leaves make it conspicuous in the summer, while the 
orange-colored fruits, especially at the north,add much color in the fall. 

The early Spanish expeditioners in Florida became acquainted 
with the persimmon through the Indians, who used both the fresh 
and dried fruits as food. Since then it has remained a source of food 
for both the white man and the negro, and its deserved popularity 
has carried it into proverbs and poetry. 

The bark and the wood are useful as well as the fruits. The latter 
are well known on account of the tannin they contain when green. 
At maturity this disappears, and so much sugar develops that the 
fruits decay very slowly, if at all. They sometimes hang on the trees 
all through the winter; thus partly dried, when foods are scarce, they 
constitute a temptation and a decoy for various wild animals when 
man is in search of animal food or "sport." Man and also domestic 
animals are fond of the fruits; but the natm-al supply is not conserved 
as it should be, nor is the tree cultivated to the extent its ornamental 
and economic possibilities demand. John K. Small,. 

Explanation op Plate. Fig. 1. — Fruiting branch. Fig. 2. — Seed. Fig. 
3. — Staminate flowers. Fig. 4. — Portion of staminate flower, showing stamens, 
X 3. Fig. 5. — Pistillate flower. Fig. 6. — Portion of pistillate flower, showing 
pistil and rudimentary stamen, X 3. 



PLATE 86 



ADDISONIA 






A^ CLoTtrn-- 



LEPADENA MARGINATAM 



Addisonia 11 

(Plate 86) 

LEPADENA MARGINATA 
Snow-on-the-mountain 

Native oj the central and western United States 
Family Euphorbia ceae Spurge Family 

Euphorbia niarginata Pursh, Fl. Am. Sept. 607. 1814. 

Euphorbia leucoloma Raf. All. Jour. 177. 1833. 

Lepadena leucoloma Raf. Fl. Tell. 4: 1 14. 1838. 

Dichrophyllum marginatum Klotzsch & Garcke, Monatsber. Akad. Berlin 1859: 

249. 1859. 
Lepadena marginata Nieuwl. Am. Midland Nat. 2: 300. 1912. 

An annual herb, one to three feet high, with a milky, acrid juice. 
The stems are erect, green, hairy, and laranched above to form a 
three-rayed, dichotomous umbel. The leaves are various, sessile, 
glabrous, ovate or oblong, and entire, except for an occasional lobing 
of the lower ones. The lower stem-leaves are alternate and scattered, 
green or somewhat variegated, one to four inches long and about an 
inch wide, and are usually subtended by narrow, deciduous stipules. 
A whorl of three or more leaves subtends the inflorescence, and many 
showy bract-like leaves, bluish-green with wide margins of white, 
subtend the flower-clusters. On slender hairy peduncles are the 
campanulate involucres, which are hairy without and within; these 
have five fimbriate, inconspicuous lobes, attached alternately with 
which are the glands, usually five in number; these are green, con- 
cave, peltate, an eighth of an inch in diameter, and have white, 
petal-like reniform appendages about twice their size. The true 
flowers, enclosed by the involucre, are a single exserted pistillate one 
with a three-lobed, three-celled ovary on a long stalk, and three 
styles, each with two recurved stigmas; this surrounded by numerous 
staminate flowers with short filaments and yellowish anthers. The 
calyces are very much reduced. The three-lobed capsules are pilose, 
one fourth of an inch in diameter; the three carpels separate elastically 
from a persistent axis, each carpel containing a roundish, pitted, gray 
seed. 

This spurge was first described by Pursh in 1814, from a specimen 
in the herbarium of Captain M. Lewis, which had been collected near 
the Yellowstone River on July 28, 1806, during the return trip of the 
Lewis and Clarke Expedition. Euphorbia marginata was one of the 
hundred or more plants described by Pursh from Captain Lewis' 
collection. Rafinesque, in his Flora Telluriana (1838) gave the name 
Lepadena to his older Euphorbia leucoloma, and in 1859 our species 
was designated Dichrophyllum marginatum by Klotzsch and Garcke, 



12 Addisonia 

both new generic names resulting from the spHtting up of the large 
genus Euphorbia. 

Soon after its discovery tliis plant was introduced to cultivation in 
England. Our illustration was made from a specimen from the flower 
borders of the New York Botanical Garden. The snow-on-the- 
mountain is a common garden annual, grown for its showy white- 
margined upper leaves. The flowers are inconspicuous, but interesting 
in structure. A related annual flower of our gardens is Poinseitia 
heicrophylla, with red color on the upper leaves. This is sometimes 
called in contrast " fire-on-the-mountain." 

It is a hardy annual, the self-sown seeds germinating the following 
spring. It may also be propagated readily by seeds, sown in the 
spring under glass or in the open ground. 

Kenneth R. Boynton. 

Explanation OF Plate. Fig. I. — Flowering stem. Fig. 2. — Involucre, X 4. 
Fig. 3.— Fruit, X 3. Fig. 4.— Seed, X 3. 



PLATE 87 



ADDISONIA 





MAACKIA AMURENSIS BUERGERI 



Addisonia 13 

(Plate 87) 

MAACKIA AMURENSIS BUERGERI 
Japanese Yellow-wood 

Native oj Japan 
Family Fab ace; AS Pea Family 

Buergeria floribunda Miq. Ann. Mus. Bot. Lugd. 3: 53. 1867. 

Cladrastis amurensis Buergeri Maxim. Bull. Acad. St.-Petersb. 18: 400. 1873. 

Maackia amurensis Buergeri Schneid. 111. Handb. Laubh. 2- 16. 1907. 

This, a small tree, attains a height of twenty feet or more, with its 
branches ascending and the white flowers in dense clusters. The 
growths of the year are densely pubescent, later becoming glabrous. 
The compound leaves are usually six inches to a foot long, alternate, 
unequally pinnate, the rachis pubescent. The opposite leaflets, 
commonly nine to thirteen and on villous stalks less than an eighth 
of an inch long, have elliptic, oval, or ovate blades which are rounded 
at the base and obtuse or acute at the apex, and are placed usually 
at a right angle to the rachis; they have the upper surface glabrous 
and dark green, the lower paler and densely appressed-pubescent. 
The inflorescence is composed of three to five spreading or ascending 
racemes arranged in a terminal panicle up to eight inches long; the 
axes of the racemes and of the panicle are pubescent with short brown 
hairs. The flowers, on spreading pedicels a quarter inch long or less 
and covered with short brown hairs, are three eighths to a half inch 
long. The broadly bell-shaped calyx is about an eighth of an inch 
long, has a manifest dorsal swelling, and is appressed-pubescent with 
short golden-brown hairs; its teeth are very short. The petals are 
three eighths of an inch long or a little more ; the standard has a long 
claw, the orbicular-obovate blade strongly recurved and emarginate 
at the apex; the keel and wings have manifest stalks, the blades 
lobed at the base, the keel folded, hood-shaped at the apex. The 
stamens are ten, somewhat united at the base, curved at the apex. 
The ovary is pubescent and bears a short glabrous style. The 
brown flat pods are one and a half to three inches long and from a 
quarter to three eighths of an inch wide, with commonly three to five 
seeds, rarely fewer. 

When in flower an attractive and decorative tree, the blossoms 
occurring in great profusion. It is entirely hardy in the latitude of 
New York and would be an addition to any collection of trees and 
shrubs. In the arboretum of the New York Botanical Garden there 
are two forms of this Japanese yellow-wood; one of these comes into 
bloom in July or early August, the other bears its flowers about a 
month later, at a time when the fruit of the former is well on its way 



14 Addisonia 

to maturity. It is from this late-flowering form that the illustration 
has been prepared. Propagation is effected by means of seeds, sown 
in the spring, or by root-grafting. 

The genus Maackia, the representative in eastern Asia of Cladrasiis 
in the eastern part of the United States, contains two or three species. 
Maackia amurcnsis is a native of Manchuria, and differs from this in 
having the leaves glabrous. The variety Buergeri, possibly specifi- 
cally distinct, is confined to Japan. Another Japanese species is the 

shrubby Maackia Tashiroi. 

George V. Nash. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering branch. Fig. 2 — Flower, X 2. 
Fig. 3. — Flower, calyx removed, X 2. Fig. 4. — ^Flower, the calyx, wings, and 
keel removed, X 2. Fig. 5.— Keel, X 2. Fig. 6— Wing, X 2. Fig. 7.— Pod. 



1 



PLATE 88 



ADDISONIA 




^ 




HIBISCUS OCULIROSEUS 



Addisonia 15 

(Plate 88) 

fflBISCUS OCULIROSEUS 
Crimson-eye Rose Mallow 

Native of the eastern United States, especially New Jersey 
Family Mai,vaceas Mallow Family 

Hibiscus oculiroseus Britton, Jour. N. Y. Bot. Gard. 4: 220. 1903. 

A perennial herb usually five or six feet tall, with numerous cane- 
like stems. The leaves are ovate or ovate-lanceolate, obtuse or 
slightly cordate at the base, acuminate at the apex, palmately veined, 
dentate or slightly crenate, densely but finely white stellate-pubes- 
cent beneath, and green and slightly pubescent above. The blades 
of the largest leaves attain as much as seven inches in length and are 
somewhat three-lobed. The flowers are conspicuous, often with a 
spread of six inches, and clustered on branches arising from several 
of the upper nodes of the several main stems. The petioles and 
peduncles are often adnate to each other. The corolla-lobes are pale 
sea-foam yellow, almost white, with an eye of a Tyrian rose fcolor 
which is a rather intense shade of red. The caly^-lobes are triangu- 
lar-lanceolate; the bractlets are linear, shorter than the calyx and 
somewhat spreading. The stamens are of unequal length, those near 
the base of the column being shorter than those above. The pollen 
is white with a faint suggestion of sea-foam yeUow. The style- 
branches are spreading, but not strongly recurving, and only slightly 
expanding into stigmatic surfaces. The mature capsule is ovoid- 
conic, long-pointed, and five-valved. The seeds are reniform and 
glabrous. 

Two living plants of this species were obtained at Absecon, New 
Jersey, by William F. Bassett, a murseryman of Hammonton, New 
Jersey, about the year 1880. In Mr. Bassett's words, ' 'a great many 
thousands" of plants descended from these two plants were raised 
from seed and sold to the trade under the popular name of "crimson- 
eyed mallow," with the designation of Hibiscus Moscheutos var. 
albus. A single plant from this source was obtained by the New 
York Botanical Garden in the year 1896. In 1903, Dr. N. L. Britton 
recognized several striking diagnostic characters and gave it the spe- 
cific rank noted above. 

Pedigreed cultures have been grown at the New York Botanical 
Garden for several generations of descent from the type plant. 
Some lines of descent have bred remarkably true; others have shown 
a tendency to vary, giving decreased intensity of color in the eye area 
and developing diffuse pale pink colors in the blades. 



16 Addisonia 

This species crosses readily with different forms and varieties of 
Hibiscus Moscheutos. The second generation of such hybrids breaks 
up into almost every conceivable grade of variation in regard to eye. 
and blade colorations and to characters of stigmas, stamens, and pods. 
Duplicates of many if not all grades of these hybrids may be found 
growing wild, which contribute much to confusion in the identification 
of the species. 

The \\Titer has found plants, agreeing with the type of the species, 
growing as far north as Rockaway Beach, Long Island. Plants that 
appear to conform closely to type were found to be abundant along 
the Tuckahoe River and Cedar Creek near their junction: here pure 
stands of the plants in number were found growing over an area of 
considerable size. The geographic distribution of this species is 
not fully determined at the present time, but it is clearly much more 
limited in range than is the principal form of Hibiscus Moscheutos. 

Besides being cultivated rather extensively for their horticultural 
value, plants of this species have been utilized in hybridization with 
others by various horticultural firms in the production of novelties. 

A. B. Stout. 

Explanation op Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering stem. Fig. 2. — Fruit. Fig. 
3.— Seed, X 3. 



PLATE 89 



ADDISONIA 




CORNUS OFFICINALIS 



Addisonia 17 

(Plate 89) 

CORNUS OFFICINALIS 
Japanese Early Dogwood 

Native of Japan 
Family Cornaceab Dogwood Family 

Cornus officinalis Sieb. & Zucc, FI. Jap. 1: 100. 1838., 

A shrub or small tree up to fifteen feet tall, of rather dense habit, 
with ascending branches, and yellow flowers, preceding the leaves, 
in clusters terminating the branchlets. The opposite leaves, with 
petioles a half inch long or less, have the blades elliptic to ovate, 
rounded or acute at the base, acuminate at the apex, rather dark 
green and glabrous above, paler and appressed-pubescent beneath; 
they measure two to three inches long and three quarters to one and 
a half inches wide, and have five or six curved nerves on each side, 
the axils of which, on the lower surface, are furnished with dense 
masses of golden-brown hairs. The yellow flowers are in clusters of 
usually twenty or more; they are subtended by yellowish bracts 
marked with brown, appressed-pubescent, and shorter than the 
hairy pedicels. The flower-parts are in fours ; the calyx is appressed- 
pubescent, the four lobes very short; the petals are reflexed, ovate- 
lanceolate, acute, about three sixteenths of an inch long. The four 
stamens are shorter than the petals. The style is slender and about 
as long as the stamens. The fruit is scarlet, oblong, about a half 
inch long and with a diameter a little more than half the length. 

This, a native of the mountainous regions of Japan, is closely related 
to another species, of southeastern Europe and the Orient, Cornus 
Mas, known as the Cornelian cherry. The Japanese species may be 
readily distinguished by the dense tufts of brown hairs in the axils 
of the lower stuface of the leaves. Cornus officinalis, as it occurs in 
the collections of the New York Botanical Garden, compared with 
Cornus Mas, is a denser more symmetric shrub or small tree and pro- 
duces flowers much more freely, features which make it more valuable 
as a decorative plant. The flowers appear usually early in April, 
before the leaves, the fruit ripening in the early fall. The specimen, 
now in the fruticetum, from which the illustration was prepared has 
been in the collections of the New York Botanical Garden since 1900. 
This species may be propagated from seeds, which usually germinate 
the second year after sowing, or by grafting. 

In the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere the genus 
Cornus is found rather widely distributed; there is one species known 
from Peru. Restricted to those forms which have no involucre, or 



18 

only a small one, there are about thirty-five known species. Related 
genera are Benihamia and Cynoxylon, both with large showy invo- i 
lucres, the former an Asiatic genus of a single species, illustrated at | 
plate 43 of this work, the latter of two species, both natives of the i 
United States. These genera are by some considered a part of 

Corntis. ^ ,r TVT ' 

George V. Nash. 

1 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1.— Flowering branch. Fig. 2.— Flower, X 4. ' 
Pig 3. —Fruiting branch. Fig. 4.— Leaf, showing masses of brown hairs in the j 
axils of the lower surface. \ 



PLATE 90 



ADDISONIA 




/vfE-.E-Olirn^ 



OPUNTIA LASIACANTHA 



Addisonia 19 

(Plate 90) 

OPUNTIA LASIACANTHA 
Slender White-spined Prickly Pear 

Native oj central and southern Mexico 

Family Cactaceab Cactus Family 

Opuntia lasiacantha Pfeiffer, Enum. Cact. 160. 1837. 

Opuntia megacantha lasiacantha Berger, Bot. Jahrb. 36: 453. 1905. 

}Opuntia chaetocarpa Griffiths, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 27: 25. 1914, 

A large and much-branched cactus, six feet high or higher, the 
lower, trunk-like part sometimes becoming eight inches thick. The 
joints are flat, dull-green, about a foot long or less, often eight inches 
wide, and scarcely half an inch thick; the areoles are small and cir- 
cular, mostly an inch or more apart; the leaves are minute, reddish, 
awl-shaped, and fall away early. There are from one to fom- needle- 
like spines at most of the younger areoles, which diverge from the 
joints at rather wide angles; the spines are white, with somewhat 
brown or blackish tips, and they are about two inches long or less, 
one of them usually much longer than the others ; old areoles develop 
more numerous spines, sometimes as many as fifteen, and they fade 
grey; the glochids are yellowish to brown and form a tuft at the upper 
part of each areole, just above the spines, when young about one 
eighth of an inch long, but twice that length when old. The flowers 
appear singly at areoles on the edges of the joints near the top; the 
ovary is obovoid, nearly one inch long, and rather more than half an 
inch thick; the sepals are about half an inch long, ovate and pointed; 
the spreading petals are about fifteen in number and from one inch 
to one and a half inches in length, obovate, variously pointed, 
rounded or notched at the apex, and narrowed or wedge-shaped at 
the base; in color they are described as yellow or orange on different 
plants, in this color-difference agreeing with several other species of 
Opuntia; the numerous yellow stamens are less than half as long as 
the petals; the style is pink and the stigma-lobes green. The fruit 
is a globose-obovoid, red berry, nearly two inches long, with a deeply 
sunken top, its areoles bearing a tuft of short glochids and an occa- 
sional bristle. 

This cactus appears to have a wide range in the dry parts of central 
and southern Mexico; it is a member of the group of white-spined 
prickly pears (tunas) yielding edible fruits which are important as 
food in Mexico and are exported; the fruit of 0. lasiacantha is, how- 
ever, not of the best quality. Many races of this group of prickly 
pears are cultivated for their fruits and have thus been crudely se- 
lected; their botanical classification is very difficult and it is perhaps 
impossible to define accurately the really wild species. 



20 Addisonia 

As understood by me, Opuntia lasiacantha has its closest relative 
in Opuntia megacantha, also native of Mexico, which differs from it 
in having larger joints, longer and stouter spines, and larger fruit; 
perhaps these differences are neither constant enough nor sufficient 
to constitute specific distinctness. 

The plant from which our illustration was painted was collected by 
J. N. Rose in 1906, near the City of Mexico; it has flowered fre- 
quently at the New York Botanical Garden, and cuttings from it have 

yielded several large specimens. 

N. L. Brixton. 



1 



m 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME I 



PART 1 



PLATE 


1. 


RHODODENDRON CAROLINIANUM 


PLATE 


11. 


PLATE 


2. 


CASSIA POLYPHYLLA 


PLATE 


12. 


PLATE 


3. 


ROBINIA KELSEYI 


PLATE 


13. 


PLATE 


4. 


PACHYPHYTUM LONQIFOLIUM 


PLATE 


14. 


PLATE 


5. 


BEGONIA COWELLII 


PLATE 


15. 


PLATE 


6. 


ECHEVERIA SETOSA 


PLATE 


16. 


PLATE 


7. 


COLUMN EA GLORIOSA 


PLATE 


17. 


PLATE 


8. 


FOUQUIERIA FORMOSA 


PLATE 


18. 


PLATE 


9. 


MAXILLARIA RINQENS 


PLATE 


19. 


PLATE 


10. 


NOPALEA AWBERI 
PART 3 


PLATE 


20. 


PLATE 


21. 


ADOXA MOSCHATELLINA 


PLATE 


31A. 


PLATE 


22. 


SISYRINCHIUM BERMUDIANA 


PLATE 


31B. 


PLATE 


23. 


COLUMNEA HIRTA 


PLATE 


32. 


PLATE 


24. 


PEDILANTHUS SMALLII 


PLATE 


33. 


PLATE 


25. 


CREMNOPHILA NUTANS 


PLATE 


34. 


PLATE 


26. 


PITHECOLOBIUM GUADALUPENSE 


PLATE 


35. 


PLATE 


27. 


ANTHURIUM GRANDIFOLtUM 


PLATE 


36. 


PLATE 


28. 


EPIDENDRUM PALEACEUM 


PUTE 


37. 


PLATE 


29. 


BEGONIA WILLIAMSII 


PLATE 


38. 


PLATE 


30. 


ONCIDIUM UROPHYLLUM 


PLATE 
PLATE 


39. 

40. 



PART 2 

CRINUM AMERICANUM 
CLETHRA ALNIFOLA 
ECHEVERIA CARNICOLOR 
MINA LOBATA 

CLERODENDRON TRICHOTOMUM 
NOTYLIA SAGITTIFERA 
EXOGONIUM MICRODACTYLUM 
VITEX AGNUS-CASTUS 
OPUNTIA MACRORHIZA 
COMMELINA COMMUNIS 

PART 4 

SEDUM DIVERSIFOLIUM 
SEDUM HUMIFUSUM 
CATASETUM SCURRA 
CHIONODOXA LUCILIAE QIGANTEA 
AGAVE SUBSIMPLEX 
DASYSTEPHANA PORPHYRIO 
RHUS HIRTA DISSECTA 
CYMOPHYLLUS FRASERl 
OPUNTIA VULGARIS 
TILLANDSIA SUBLAXA 
ECHEVERIA AUSTRALIS 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME M 



PART 1 

PLATE 41. NOLINA TEXANA PLATE 51. 

PUTE 42. TRICHOSTERIQMA BENEDICTUM PLATE 52. 

PLATE 43. BENTHAMIA JAPONrCA PLATE 53. 

PLATE 44. DIRCAEA MAGNIFICA PLATE 54. 

PLATE 45. BUDDLEIA DAVIDI PLATE 55. 

PUTE 46. GONGORA TRUNCATA ALBA PUTE 56. 

PUTE 47. WERCKLEOCEREUS GUBER PUTE 57. 

PUTE 48. DUDLEYA BRANDEGEI PUTE 58. 

PUTE 49. ABELIA GRAN Dl FLORA PUTE 59. 

PUTE 60. PEPEROMIA OBTUSIFOLIA PUTE 60. 



PART 2 

SOLI DAGO JUNCEA 
ECHEVERIA MULTICAULIS 
CATASETUM VIRIDIFUVUM 
SA6ITTARIA UTIFOLIA 
BACCHARIS HALIMIFOLIA 
XANTHISMA TEXANUM 
SEDUM BOURGAEI 
CIMICIFUGA SIMPLEX 
FEIJOA SELLOWIANA 
ASTER AMETHYSTINUS 



PART 3 



PUTE 


61. 


HARRISIA GRACILIS 


PUTE 71 


PUTE 


62. 


EPIDENDRUM OBLONQATUM 


PUTE 72 


PUTE 


63. 


AESCULUS PARVI FLORA 


PUTE 73 


PUTE 


64. 


MICRAMPELIS LOBATA 


PUTE 74 


PUTE 


65. 


BOMAREA EDULIS 


PLATE 75 


PUTE 


66. 


ASTER TATARICUS 


pUTE 76 


PUTE 


67. 


PACHYPHYTUM BRACTEOSUM 


PUTE 77 


PUTE 


68. 


HARRISIA MARTINI 


PUTE 78 


PUTE 


69. 


ONCIDIUM PUBES 


PUTE 79 


PUTE 


70. 


RAPHIOLEPtS UMBELLATA 


PUTE 80 



PART 4 

ROSA "SILVER MOON" 
DENDROBIUM ATROVIOUCEUM 
CENTRADENIA FLORISUNOA 
PIAROPUS AZUREUS 
SOLIDAGO ALTISSIMA 
PENTAPTERYGIUM SERPENS 
FREYLINIA LANCEOUTA 
ANNESLIA TWEEDIEI 
CRASSUU OUADRIFIDA 
ASTER CORblFOLIUS 



CONTENTS 



Plate 81. 


Plate 82. 


Plate 83A, 


PLATE 83 B 


Plate 84. 


Plate 85. 


Plate 86. 


Plate 87. 


Plate 88. 


PLATE 89. 


Plate 90. 



ARONIA ATROPURPUREA 
ASTER NOVAE-ANGLIAE 
GYMNOCALYCIUM MULTIFLORUM 
GYMNOCALYCIUM MOSTII 
EUONYMUS ALATA 
DIOSPYROS VIRGINIANA 
LEPADENA MARGINATA 
MAAGKIA AMURENSIS BUERGERI 
HIBISCUS OCULIROSEUS 
CORNUS OFFICINALIS 
OPUNTIA LASIACANTHA 



v»;.. 



ADDISONIA 



COLORED ILLUSTRATIONS 

AND 

POPULAR DESCRIPTIONS 

OF 

PLANTS 



Volume 3 



Number 2 



JUNE, 1918 




PUBLISHED BY 

THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN 

(ADDISON BROWN FUND) 
JUNE 29, 1918 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



A bequest made to the New York Botanical Garden by its late 
President, Judge Addison Brown, established the 

ADDISON BROWN FUND 

"the income and accumulations from which shall be applied to the 
founding and publication, as soon as practicable, and to the 
maintenance (aided by subscriptions therefor), of a high-class 
magazine bearing my name, devoted exclusively to the illustration 
by colored plates of the plants of the United States and its terri- 
torial possessions, and of other plants flowering in said Garden or 
its conservatories; with suitable descriptions in popular language, 
and any desirable notes and synonomy, and a brief statement 
of the known properties and uses of the plants illustrated." 

The preparation and publication of the work have been referred 
to Dr. John H. Barnhart, Bibliographer, and Mr. George V. Nash, 
Head Gardener. 

Addisonia is published as a quarterly magazine, in March, June, 
September, and December. Each part consists of ten colored plates 
with accompanying letterpress. The subscription price is $10 
annually, four parts constituting a volume. The parts will not 
be sold separately. 

Address: 

THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN 
BRONX PARK 

NEW YORK CITY 

Subscribers are advised to bind each volume of ADDISONIA as 
completed, in order to avoid possible loss or misplacement of the parts; 
nearly the whole remainder of the edition of Volumes 1 and 2 has 
been made up into complete volumes, and but few separate parts 
can be supplied. Nevu subscriptions mil be accepted only as includ- 
ing the first volumes. 



PLATE 91 



ADDISONIA 




M.f .tbJj-^7'^ 



COTONEASTER SIMONSII 



Addisonia 2 1 

(Plate 91) 

COTONEASTER SIMONSII 

Simons' Cotoneaster 

Native of the temperate Himalayan Region 
Family Pomackae Apple Family 

Cotoneaster Simonsii Baker, in Saund. Ref. Bot. pi. 55. 1869. 

A shrub of rather open habit, with spreading branches, roundish 
leaves, white flowers marked with bright rose, and bright red fruit. 
The older branches are of a dark purple or purplish gray, and 
rather sparingly pubescent; the pubescent new growths are usually 
of a yellowish brown. The leaves, in clusters of two to four on 
short lateral branches, are broadly oval to nearly orbicular, rounded 
or somewhat wedge-shaped at the base, abruptly sharp-pointed at 
the apex, and are a half inch to an inch long, and a half inch or a 
little more wide; they are of firm texture, appressed-hairy, the 
hairs fewer at fruiting time. The small cymes, terminating the 
lateral branches, have two to four flowers, rarely a single flower, 
about a quarter of an inch long; the globose hypanthium and 
spreading calyx are appressed-pubescent, forming together a bell- 
shaped body ; the five sepals are ovate, acutish ; the five petals are 
erect, white with rose markings, ovate, obtuse or acutish. The 
fruit is bright red, broadly obovoid, and three eighths to a half 
inch long. 

A fine shrub, native of the temperate regions of Khasia and 
Sikkim in the Himalayas. It is one of the best of the red-fruited 
shrubs, a worthy addition to any collection. It is open in habit, 
with wand-like branches, bearing in June little clusters of white and 
rose flowers; these later mature into the brightest of fruits, which 
persist for some time. It was introduced into cultivation before 
1869, when it was first described from specimens secured at a 
nursery in Weymouth, England. The illustration was made from 
a specimen which has been in the collections of the New York 
Botanical Garden since 1897. This shrub may be propagated by 
seeds sown or stratified in the fall, or by grafting. 

This is one of about forty species which comprise the genus 
Cotoneaster, distributed mainly in the temperate regions of Europe 
and Asia, with a few in northern Africa; curiously enough none 
are known from Japan. The fruit is red or black, the former of 
course being much preferred on account of its greater attractiveness. 



22 Addisonia 

The members of this genus will grow in any ordinary soil, but they 
are not fond of very moist or shady locations. 

George V. Nash. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Fruiting branch. Fig. 2. — Flowering 
branch. Fig. 3. — Flower, X 4 



PLATE 92 



ADDISONIA 




^^k 




ECHEVERIA NODULOSA 



Addisonia 23 

(Plate 92; 

ECHEVERIA NODULOSA 
Red-margined Echeveria 

Native of southern Mexico 

Family Crassui^ac^a^ Orpine Family 

Cotyledon nodulosa Baker, in Saund. Ref. Bot. pi. 56. 1869, 
Echeveria nodulosa Otto, Hamb. Gartenz. 29: 8. 1873. 

A perennial with stems one to two feet long in the wild state, 
often in cultivation flowering when only a few inches high, naked 
below, crowned by an open or sometimes a dense rosette of leaves. 
The flowering stems, one or more, are erect and leafy below. The 
leaves are obovate to spatulate, two to three inches long, gradually 
becoming smaller on the flowering stems, red on the margin. The 
inflorescence is an equilateral raceme of four to eight flowers, the 
pedicels short, the longest ones not quite half an inch long. The 
five sepals are spreading. The corolla is half an inch long, and 
strongly five-angled. 

This plant was originally described by J. G. Baker from speci- 
mens supposed to have come from Mexico, and grown by W. Wilson 
Saunders of Hillfield, Reigate, England; it was also illustrated by 
Saunders. 

Until 1899 the original description and illustration represented 
our entire knowledge of this plant. In that year J. N. Rose re- 
discovered the plant on Mount Alban, near Oaxaca City, Mexico, 
and brought back to Washington living specimens which have been 
distributed widely. It has frequently flowered, both in Washington 
and in the New York Botanical Garden. In 1906 C. Conzatti of 
Oaxaca, Mexico, also collected living specimens and it was from 
these, which flowered in the New York Botanical Garden, July 24, 
1911, that our accompanying illustration was made. 

The sixty or more species of Echeveria are divided into two 
groups. The group to which E. nodulosa belongs contains about 
one third of the species and has axillary flowers arranged in equi- 
lateral racemes or slender interrupted spikes. The other group has 
flowers arranged in simple secund terminal racemes or sometimes 

compounded and in panicles. 

J. N. Rose. 



PLATE 93 



ADDISONIA 




HELIANTHUS ORGYALIS 



Addisonia 25 

(Plate 93) 

HELIANTHUS ORGYALIS 

Linear-leaved Sunflower 

Native of south-central and western United States 
Family Carduac^a^ Thistle; Family 

Helianthus orgyalis DC. Prodr. 5: 586. 1836. 

A tall perennial herb, from widely spreading rootstocks. The leafy 
stems are glabrous, somewhat glaucous, striate, slender but strong, 
six to ten feet high and much branched above. The leaves are 
alternate, sessile, linear, acuminate, with a few scattered shallow 
teeth; they are less than one half inch wide and up to eight inches 
long, recurved and drooping, and rough with pointed papillae, 
especially on the lower surfaces. The branching inflorescence bears 
many heads of flowers, which are about two inches across, the 
neutral ray-flowers being very conspicuous, ten or more in number, 
with ligules an inch long, a half inch wide, and rich yellow in color. 
The disks are small, dark brown or purple, made up of several 
perfect, fertile flowers with yellow tubes swollen near the base, and 
four or five brownish spreading lobes surrounding the erect brown 
anthers and a prominent, two-parted yellow style. The heads are 
surrounded by involucres of bracts in many series; these are 
spreading, lanceolate to subulate, squarrose and with ciliate margins. 
The receptacles are convex, with laciniate-toothed chaff. The 
achenes are four-sided, truncate, with a pappus of a few scales. 

This sunflower was first described by DeCandolle from a culti- 
vated specimen in the botanic garden at Geneva, said to have 
been grown from seed sent from Arkansas Territory by M. de 
Pourtales. It grows naturally on the dry plains from Nebraska to 
Texas and westward. With the graceful habit of a Coreopsis, it 
has none of the coarseness of many of the sunflowers. Its tall 
slender stems, arching leaves, and many bright yellow flowers 
make it one of our best perennials for the background of deep 
borders. 

Plants growing in our borders since 1911 furnished the specimen 
for our illustration. The blooming period here is September and 
October. Their propagation is best effected by division of the roots 
and their cultivation is simple. 

Kenneth R. Boynton. 



PLATE 94 



ADDISONIA 




SYMPHORICARPOS ALBUS LAEVIGATUS 



Addisonia 27 

(Plate 94) 

SYMPHORICARPOS ALBUS LAEVIGATUS 

Snowberry 

Native of northern North America 
Family Caprifoliackae; Honeysuckle) Family 

Symphoricarpos racemosus laevigatus 'Pernald, Rhodora. 7 : 167. 1905. 
Symphoricarpos albus laevigatus Blake, Rhodora 16: 119. 1914. 

A shrub up to four feet tall, with erect or ascending purplish gray 
or gray branches, somewhat drooping glabrous branchlets, and white 
and rose flowers which are followed by snow-white fruit. The 
opposite leaves, glabrous except for the ciliate margins, have 
petioles less than a quarter of an inch long; the blades are oval or 
nearly orbicular, obtuse at each end, up to one and a half inches 
long and an inch wide, and are paler beneath. The flowers, about 
three eighths of an inch long, are in few-flowered axillary clusters 
toward the end of the branches, forming a somewhat interrupted 
spike; the calyx is superior and has short lobes; the corolla is bell- 
shaped, about a quarter of an inch long, is somewhat swollen at the 
base, pubescent within, and in color white and rose, the obtuse or 
acutish lobes about half the length of the corolla. There are five 
stamens, which are shorter than the corolla, as is also the style. 
The fruit is of a snowy whiteness, often a half inch or more in 
diameter. 

This native shrub is found from Quebec to Washington, and south 
in the mountains to Virginia. It is of the easiest culture, accom- 
modating itself to almost any environment, thriving in sun or shade ; 
in fact, so prone is it to spread by means of suckers that its tendency 
in this direction must be checked if other shrubs in its neighbor- 
hood are to survive. This habit of making suckers would indicate 
its ease of propagation, and such is the case. It may also be 
propagated by means of seeds, and by hard and green-wood cut- 
tings. The specimen from which the illustration was prepared has 
been in the collections of the New York Botanical Garden for many 
years. This is one of the best of our shrubs on account of its 
handsome white fruit, which occurs in great abundance and persists 
well through the winter. 

Symphoricarpos is a genus of about sixteen species, all but one 
natives of North America, where they extend as far south as Mexico, 
the exception being found in western China. 

George V. Nash. 

Explanation op Pirate. Fig. 1. — Fruiting branch. Fig. 2. — Flowering 
branch. Fig. 3. — Flower, X 4. 



PLATE 95 



ADDISONIA 




SINNINGIA SPECIOSA 



Addisonia 29 

(Plate 95) 

SINNINGIA SPECIOSA 

Maximilian's Ligeria 

Native of Brazil 

Family Gesn^riacea^ Gesneria Family 

Sinnin^ia speciosa Hiern, Vidensk. Meddel. 1877-8: 91. 1877. 

Gloxinia speciosa Lodd. Bot. Cab. pi. 28. 1817. 

Ligeria maximiliana Hanstein, in Martius, Fl. Bras. 8*: 387. 1864. 

Stemless or nearly so. The basal leaves are often numerous, 
forming broad rosettes, short-petioled, the blades ovate to oblong, 
two to six inches long, softly pubescent on both sides, acute, 
obtusely crenate, bright green above, very pale beneath. The 
two or more peduncles are strict, two to four inches long, pubescent. 
The five calyx-lobes are greenish, lanceolate, acuminate, pubescent, 
one half to two thirds of an inch long ; there are five ovate glands at 
the ^bottom of the calyx-tube. The corolla is tubular, and either 
pendent or horizontal, one and one half to two inches long, some- 
what curved, purple, with five broad, short, spreading or reflexed 
lobes. 

This plant comes from Eastern Brazil, where it was collected by 
J. N. Rose near Cabo Frio, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, August 8, 
1915. Several tubers were sent to the New York Botanical Garden 
which have since produced flowers repeatedly and profusely. The 
plant has also fruited and from the seed a number of other speci- 
mens have been obtained. 

This species has been known in cultivation since early in the 
nineteenth century as Gloxinia speciosa, but it is generally accepted 
that it is not congeneric with the original species of that genus, 
namely, G. maculata. It will however always be best known in the 
trade under that name. To botanists it is now generally known 
as a Sinningia although it has also passed as a species of Ligeria. 
Sinningia and its related genera contain many ornamental species 
and deserve a re-study under modern taxonomic method from 
living plants preferably in some tropical garden like that at Rio de 
Janeiro, Brazil. Sinningia speciosa has undergone many changes 
in cultivation especially as to the color, shape and size of the 
flowers, while a number of species in several genera described from 
wild plants have been referred to it. Consequently the number of 
synonyms both for indigens and for cultigens is considerable. The 



30 Addisonia 

plant which we have described and figured here is not typical 
Sinningia spcciosa, but is the Ligeria maximiliana described by 
Hanstein in 1864, which also came from Cabo Frio, Brazil. 

J. N. Rose. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering plant. Fig. 2. — Dissection of 
flower, showing stamens. 



PLATE 96 



ADDISONIA 




STYLOPHORUM DIPHYLLUM 



Addisonia 31 

(Plate 96) 

STYLOPHORUM DIPHYLLUM 
Celandine Poppy 

Native of central United States 
Family Papaveraceak Poppy Family 

Chelidonium diphyllum Michx. Fl. Bor. Am. 1: 309. 1803. 
Stylophorum diphyllum Nutt. Gen. 2: 7. 1818. 
Meconopsis diphylla DC. Syst. Veg. 2: 88. 1821. 

A perennial herb with abundant yellow sap, growing nearly two 
feet high, from short rootstocks, and bearing many large yellow 
flowers in May. The stems are smooth or somewhat setose, purplish 
above, especially in the inflorescence. The leaves are smooth, 
or somewhat hairy, glaucous beneath and dull green above; they 
are pinnatifid, with oblong, sinuate lobes. The lower leaves are 
alternate and measure six inches or more in length; the two upper- 
most are opposite, subtending the inflorescence, shorter, rounded 
and more hairy. The yellow flowers are seldom solitary, usually 
clustered, on long setose peduncles which are pendulous in bud and 
fruit, and measure one to two inches across. There are two rounded 
concave sepals, and four obovate petals. Twenty or more stamens 
with short filiform filaments and oblong orange-yellow anthers 
surround the base of the conspicuous green pistil, comprising an 
ovoid one-celled ovary, a prominent style and a three-lobed stigma. 
The capsule is bristly, many-seeded, and tipped with the persistent 
style. 

The celandine poppy is one of several species of Stylophorum, 
others being found in China, Japan, and the Himalayas. It is 
found growing naturally in low woods from Pennsylvania and Ohio 
to Tennessee and westward to Wisconsin and Missouri. Although 
closely related to our blood-root and to the Asiatic Hylomecon, its 
nearest relative is the celandine, Chelidonium majus, which has 
very similar leaves and the same copious yellow sap. It is distinct 
however in the flower, and by its bristly, thickened capsule with 
persistent style instead of a linear, smooth capsule and style almost 
none. 

Our illustration was made from plants growing since 1915 in the 
Herbaceous Grounds, where they seem to thrive as well in the open 
as the celandine does. They are hardy and very floriferous in 
spring and early summer. The cultivation of this species appears 
to be little undertaken, although it was introduced into England in 



32 Addisonia 

1854, and grown there to some extent. Experience with it in the 
New York Botanical Garden would seem to justify its use as a 
border plant. Propagation is by seeds and division of the roots, 
but, like many plants of the Poppy family, transplanting is rather 
difficult. 

Kenneth R. Boynton. 



PLATE 97 



ADDISONIA 




M I L d,j>n. 



ARONIA ARBUTIFOLIA 



Addisonia 33 

(Plate 97) 

ARONIA ARBUTIFOLIA 
Red-fruited Choke-berry 

Native of eastern North America 

Family Mai^acEas Apple Family 

Mespilus arbutifolia L. Sp. PI. 478. 1753. 

Pyrus arbutifolia L. f. Suppl. 256. 1781. 

Mespilus arbutifolia erythrocarpa Michx. Fl. Bor. Am. 1: 292. 1803. 

Aronia arbutifolia EH. Bot. S. C. & Ga. 1 : 556. 1821. 

A branching shrub, sometimes attaining a height of twelve feet, 
but usually much smaller, commonly about five feet high. The 
slender young twigs are gray; the bark of old stems nearly smooth 
and dark gray; the narrow winter buds are about one quarter of an 
inch in length. At our latitude the leaves unfold in April and fall 
in late autumn; the blades are oval, oblong or obovate, obtuse or 
abruptly short-tipped, narrowed or somewhat wedge-shaped at the 
base, three inches long or less, the margin serrulate-crenulate, the 
upper surface nearly or quite smooth, the midvein bearing small 
glands, the lower surface persistently white-woolly; the petiole is 
much shorter than the blade; the small narrow stipules are early 
deciduous. The flowers, borne in terminal compound woolly 
cymes, are from four to six lines broad, and open in the south in 
March, in the north in May or early June. The calyx is woolly, 
with five acute, very glandular lobes ; the five obovate, obtuse, white 
or faintly purplish petals are nearly a quarter of an inch long. The 
fruit is a short-pyriform or subglobose drupe, one third to one half 
an inch in diameter, bright red when mature, and persists on the 
twigs until late autumn or early winter. 

The red-fruited choke-berry grows naturally in swamps, wet 
woods and thickets, from New England to Florida, extending west 
to Ohio and Louisiana. Its close relative, Aronia atropurpurea, was 
described and illustrated in this volume, at plate 81. 

The plant from which our illustration was made is growing in the 
fruticetum. New York Botanical Garden; it was obtained from 
Meehan & Sons in 1895. 

N. ly. Britton. 

Explanation op Plate. Eig. 1. — Fruiting branch. Fig. 2. — Flowering 
branch. 



PLATE 98 



ADDISONIA 









HAMAMELIS JAPONICA 



Addisonia ' 35 

(Plate 98) 

HAMAMELIS JAPONIC A 
Japanese Witch Hazel 

Family HamamkudacEa^ Witch-hazeIv Family 

Hamamelis japonica Sieb. & Zucc. Abhandl. Akad. Muench. 4: 193. 1843. 
Hamamelis arborea Masters, Gard. Chron. 35: 187. 1874. 

A shrub or small tree, sometimes attaining a height of thirty 
feet, with rather stout ascending or spreading branches which are 
covered with a brown bark, the young branchlets, leaf -buds, flower- 
stalks, and bracts pubescent with brown hairs. The leaves, which 
appear much later than the flowers, are alternate and on pubescent 
stalks one quarter to three eighths of an inch long. The glabrous 
or pubescent leaf-blades are oval to broadly ovate or obovate, or 
even nearly orbicular, with the margins sinuately crenate, and the 
veins very prominent beneath; they are from two to four inches 
long and sometimes nearly as wide, with the apex acute and the 
inequilateral base rounded or obtuse. The flower-heads, arranged 
singly or in clusters of two or three, are subtended by orbicular 
bracts and are on pubescent commonly curved stalks. When spread 
out the calyx is about a third of an inch across, with the elliptic 
obtuse lobes densely brown pubescent on the outside, glabrous and 
purple within. The yellow petals are narrowly linear, undulate, 
and a half inch to sometimes three quarters of an inch long. The 
stamens are about half as long as the sepals, the anthers purplish, 
the filaments yellowish. The hairy ovary is of two carpels, each 
with a slender purple style. The pubescent fruit is about a half 
inch long, surrounded at the base by the persistent calyx-tube, 
the carpels united nearly to the summit, the free portions forming 
spreading or reciurved horns. 

This native of the mountainous woods of Japan is one of the most 
attractive shrubs of our gardens. At home it flowers in March 
and April, but here it shows a tendency to break into blossom much 
earher than this; in 1916 its golden flowers appeared in January 
on a specimen in the fruticetum collection of the New York Botan- 
ical Garden, and persisted well into February through a heavy 
snowfall, the bright blossoms forming a striking contrast with the 
wintery surroundings. Not only does the early appearance of its 
blossoms make it welcome, but their brightness and profusion 
make it doubly so. 

While this Japanese plant is among the first to tell us that winter 
is waning, and that spring will be here ere long, its close relative, 
Hamamelis virginiana, a native of the eastern parts of our own 
country, is the latest to flower of our eastern shrubs, its flowers 
appearing late in the fall and sometimes persisting into early winter. 



36 Addisonia 

It is this diflference in flowering period which constitutes its chief 
value in horticulture, for botanically the differences separating the 
two species, while valid, are not marked, the most conspicuous 
being the purple color of the inside of the calyx in Hamamelis 
japonica, which serves to intensify the yellow of the petals. In 
blossom both are equally conspicuous, for the Japanese plant bears 
its flowers before the leaves appear, while our plant takes on its 
mantle of gold after the leaves have fallen. 

About 1862 the Japanese witch hazel was introduced into cultiva- 
tion by von Siebold, according to a statement made by Masters in 
the Gardners' Chronicle early in 1874. It was apparently first 
offered for sale in a trade catalogue issued by Messrs. Ottolander, 
of Boskoop, Holland, as Hamamelis arborea, under which name 
it was described by Masters. It appears to be somewhat variable 
as to habit and color of flowers, and the form of more vigorous 
growth and larger flowers with a purple calyx represents what is 
now called H. japonica arborea Rehder, the Hamamelis arborea of 
Masters. The plant from which the illustration was prepared was 
secured at the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1901, and has been in the 
collections of the New York Botanical Garden since that time. 

The genus Hamamelis contains four species, equally divided 
between Asia and America. In addition to the common species of 
the United States, Hamamelis virginiana, another, H. vernalis, is 
known from the south central United States; the latter blossoms 
in the spring. One Asiatic species is here illustrated, the other, 
Hamamelis mollis, is from Central China. They thrive best in a 
somewhat moist soil, the Japanese species, however, doing well in a 
drier situation than the others, while H. virginiana flourishes not 
only in shady places, its preference in the wild, but also in sunny 
positions. They may be propagated from seeds, which do not 
germinate until the second year, or by layering; they may also be 
grafted in the spring, in the green-house, on seedlings of Hamamelis 
virginiana. 

George V. Nash. 

Explanation OF Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering branch. Fig. 2. — Flower, X 3. 
Fig. 3. — Fruit. Fig. 4. — I^eaf. 



PLATE 99 



ADDISONIA 





\^J 



^ 




HIBISCUS MOSCHEUTOS 






Addisonia 37 

(Plate 99) 
HIBISCUS MOSCHEUTOS 

Swamp Rose-Mallow 

Native of eastern United States 
Family Mai,vacbab Mai^low Family 

Hibiscus Moscheutos L. Sp. PI. 693. 1753. 
^Hibiscus palustris L. Sp. PI. 693. 1753. 
Hibiscus opulifoUus Greene, Leaflets 2: 65. 1910. 

A perennial herb, usually five or six feet tall, with numerous cane- 
like stems. The leaves are ovate or ovate-lanceolate, obtuse or 
slightly cordate at the base, acuminate at the apex, palmately 
veined, dentate or slightly crenate, densely but finely white stellate- 
pubescent beneath and usually only slightly pubescent above. The 
blades of the largest leaves are somewhat three-lobed. The stems, 
petioles and veins are with or without red pigmentation. The 
petioles and peduncles are often adnate to each other. The calyx- 
lobes are ovate. The corollas are large (often as much as 7 inches 
in diameter) and conspicuous; in color they range from white 
through various shades of pink, with or without an eye which is 
of a darker shade than the blade. The stamens are of nearly 
equal length. The pollen is either white or yellow. The style- 
branches are short, spreading but not recurving, and with decidedly 
expanded stigmatic surfaces. The capsules are ovoid, about one 
inch long, glabrous or slightly pubescent, and abruptly short- 
pointed or blunt. The seeds are reniform and glabrous. 

This species grows in abundance along the coastal region of the 
eastern United States, extending inland in scattered stations to 
Missouri. It evidently reaches its greatest development in numbers 
in the marshes along the coast of central and southern New Jersey, 
where its tall vigorous growth and gayly-colored, conspicuous 
flowers make it a noticeable and popularly well known feature of the 
vegetation. Here there is a medley of flower-colors, illustrating 
well the polymorphism that has long been recognized in this species. 
Several of the forms have been found to breed true (Torreya 17: 
142-148) as distinct races; numerous other races undoubtedly 
exist. There will probably always be some doubt as to the identity, 
at least in respect to flower color, of the particular American plant 
which I^innaeus included in his citations. The flower shown in 
the accompanying illustration is from a cultivated plant whose 
seed-parent grew wild at Hunter's Island in Long Island Sound. 
The type which it represents may be found in nearly all stations 



38 Addisonia 

for the species along the coast north of Cape May which is as far 
south as the writer has made field observations. In northern 
stations of the range (Ohio, Presque Isle in Lake Erie, and along 
the Seneca River near Weedsport and Savannah, N. Y.) this is the 
only form represented. This type or race appears to be the one 
most widely distributed at least in the area north of Cape May. 

The range of this species overlaps somewhat the ranges of several 
species more exclusively southern and western in distribution. 
Natural hybrids between these undoubtedly exist; certain of these 
species have been hybridized in the production of races of horti- 
cultural value. 

A. B. Stout. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering stem. Fig. 2. — Fruit. Fig. 
3.— Seed, X 3. 



I 

■f 

'< 
I 

,1 
1 



PLATE lOO 



ADDISONIA 




SOBRALIA SESSILIS 



Addisonia 39 

(Plate 100) 
SOBRALIA SESSILIS 

Sessile-flowered Sobralia 

Native of Guiana 

Family Orchidac^aiS Orchid Family 

Sobralia sessilis Lindl. Bot. Reg. 27: Misc. 3. 1847. 

Stems clustered, up to four feet tall, branched at some of the 
upper nodes; these branches, developing roots, may be used in 
propagating new plants. The stems, sheaths, and under surface 
of the leaf-blades are pubescent with short black spreading hairs. 
The leaves are alternate, narrowly elliptic to elliptic-lanceolate, 
narrowed to an obtuse base, the apex acute; the undulate blades 
are up to six inches long and two inches wide, and are rather promi- 
nently seven-nerved beneath. The flowers, about two and a half 
inches long and broad, are in terminal few-flowered spikes, only one 
flower appearing at a time, the acute bracts pubescent like the leaf- 
sheaths. The rose-colored sepals, paler beneath, are oblong-elliptic, 
abruptly acute, about one and a half inches long, the lateral spread- 
ing, the dorsal ascending. The petals resemble the sepals in color 
and shape, but are broader and a trifle shorter. The lip, about as 
long as the petals, entirely surrounds the column ; the tube is paler 
below, darkening above into the rich rose-purple of the short limb, 
which is undulate, crisped and irregularly toothed on the margin; 
the inside of the tube is a rich magenta. The column is club- 
shaped, about half as long as the lip, white faintly flushed with 
rose. The anther is yellow. 

The plant from which this illustration was prepared formed part 
of a collection of orchids presented in 1900 by Mrs. George Such to 
the New York Botanical Garden, where it has flowered repeatedly. 
This, one of the least conspicuous of the genus, was discovered in 
Demerara by Schomburgk, and flowered in the latter part of 1840 
at the nurseries of Messrs. Loddiges, in England. 

The genus Sobralia, comprising about sixty species, is found in 
tropical America from Peru to Guiana and Mexico. The species 
vary greatly in size, some being but a foot high, while others have 
stems ten feet tall or more. Some species have small flowers, while 
in others the flowers are as large and as showy as those of Cattleya 
lahiata. In color the blossoms range from white to yellow, and 
from rose and purple to almost a blue. One of the larger and 
showy kinds is Sobralia macrantha, a native of Mexico and Guate- 



40 Addisonia 

mala. They are usually of easy culture, requiring an abundance 
of water during the growing season, and do best if allowed a period 
of rest, when water is withheld, but never to the extent of allowing 
the soil to become quite dr}\ 

George V. Nash. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering branch. Fig. 2. — Column, side 
view. Fig. 3. — Column, front view. Fig. 4. — Pollinia, side view, X 5. Fig. 5. 
— Pollinia, rear view, X 5. Fig. 6. — Anther, X 5. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 1 



PUTE 


1. 


PLATE 


2. 


PLATE 


3. 


PLATE 


4. 


PUTE 


5. 


PLATE 


6. 


PLATE 


7. 


PLATE 


8. 


PLATE 


9. 


PLATE 


10. 


PLATE 


11. 


PLATE 


12. 


PLATE 


13. 


PLATE 


14, 


PLATE 


15. 


PLATE 


16. 


PUTE 


17. 


PUTE 


18. 


PUTE 


19. 


PUTE 


20. 



RHODODENDRON CAROLINIANUM 
CASSIA POLYPHYLU 
ROBINIA KELSEYl 
PACHYPHYTUM LONGIFOLIUM 
BEGONIA COWELLII 
ECHEVERIA SETOSA 
COLUMNEA GLORIOSA 
FOUQUIERIA FORMOSA 
MAXILURIA RINGENS 
NOPALEA AUBERI 

CRINUM AMERICANUM 

OLETHRA ALNIFOLIA 

ECHEVERIA CARNICOLOR 

MINA LOBATA 

CLERODENDRON TRICHOTOMUM 

NOTYLIA SAGITTIFERA 

EXOGONIUM MICRODACTYLUM 

VITEX AGNUS-CASTUS 

OPUNTIA MACRORHIZA 

COMMELINA COMMUNIS 



PUTE 


21. 


PUTE 


22. 


PUTE 


23. 


PUTE 


24. 


PUTE 


25. 


PUTE 


26. 


PUTE 


27. 


PUTE 


28. 


PUTE 


29. 


PUTE 


30. 


PUTE 


31A, 


PUTE 


31B. 


PUTE 


32. 


PUTE 


33. 


PUTE 


34. 


PUTE 


35. 


PUTE 


36. 


PUTE 


37. 


PUTE 


38. 


PUTE 


39. 


PUTE 


40. 



ADOXA MOSCHATELLINA 
SISYRINCHIUM BERMUDIANA 
COLUMNEA HIRTA 
PEDIUNTHUS SMALLII 
CREMNOPHIU NUTANS 
PITHECOLOBIUM GUADALUPENSE 
ANTHURIUM GRANDIFOLIUM 
EPIDENDRUM PALEACEUM 
BEGONIA WILLIAMSIt 
ONCIDIUM UROPHYLLUM 
SEDUM DIVERSIFOLIUM 
SEDUM HUMIFUSUM 
CATASETUM SCURRA 
CHIONODOXA LUCILIAE GIGANTEA 
AGAVE SUBSIMPLEX 
DASYSTEPHANA PORPHYRIO 
RHUS HIRTA DISSECTA 
CYMOPHYLLUS FRASERI 
OPUNTIA VULGARIS 
TILUNDSIA SUBUXA 
ECHEVERIA AUSTRALIS 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2 



PUTE 


41. 


PUTE 


42. 


PUTE 43. 


PUTE 


44. 


PUTE 


45. 


PUTE 


46. 


PUTE 


47. 


PUTE 


48, 


PUTE 


49. 


PUTE 


50, 


PUTE 


51, 


PUTE 


52. 


PUTE 


53. 


PUTE 


54. 


PUTE 


55 


PUTE 


56, 


PLATE 


57. 


PUTE 


58. 


PUTE 


59. 


PUTE 


60. 



NOLINA TEXANA PUTE 61. 
TRICHOSTERIGMA BENEDICTUM PUTE 62. 

BENTHAMIA JAPONICA PUTE 63. 

DIRCAEA MAGNIFICA PUTE 64. 

BUDDLEIA DAVIDI PUTE 65. 

GONGORA TRUNCATA ALBA PUTE 66. 

WERCKLEOCEREUS GUBER PUTE 67. 

DUDLEYA BRANDEGEI PUTE 68. 

ABELIA GRANDIFLORA PUTE 69. 

PEPEROMIA OBTUSIFOLIA PUTE 70. 

SOLIDAGO JUNCEA PUTE 71. 

ECHEVERIA MULTICAULIS PUTE 72. 

CATASETUM VIRIDIFUVUM PUTE 73. 

SAGITTARIA UTIFOLIA PUTE 74. 

BACCHARIS HALIMIFOLIA PUTE 75. 

XANTHISMA TEXANUM PUTE 76. 

SEDUM BOURGAEI PUTE 77. 

CIMICIFUGA SIMPLEX PUTE 78. 

FEIJOA SELLOWIANA PUTE 79. 

ASTER AMETHYSTINUS PUTE 80. 



HARRISIA GRACILIS 
EPIDENDRUM OBLONGATUM 
AESCULUS PARVIFLORA 
MICRAMPELIS LOBATA 
BOMAREA EDULIS 
ASTER TATARICUS 
PACHYPHYTUM BRACTEOSUM 
HARRISIA MARTINI 
ONCIDIUM PUBES 
RAPHIOLEPIS UMBELUTA 
ROSA "SILVER MOON" 
DENDROBIUM ATROVIOUCEUM 
CENTRADENIA FLORIBUNDA 
PIAROPUS AZUREUS 
SOLIDAGO ALTISSIMA 
PENTAPTERYGIUM SERPENS 
FREYLINIA LANCEOLATA 
ANNESLIA TWEEDIEI 
CRASSUU OUADRIFIDA 
ASTER CORDIFOLIUS 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 3 

PUTE 81. ARONIA ATROPURPUREA 

PUTE 82. ASTER NOVAE-ANGLIAE 

PUTE 83A. GYMNOCALYCIUM MULTIFLORUM 

PUTE 83B. GYMNOCALYCIUM MOSTII 

PUTE 84. EUONYMUS ALATA 

PUTE 85. DIOSPYROS VIRGINIANA 

PUTE 86. LEPADENA MARGINATA 

PUTE 87. MAACKIA AMURENSIS BUERGERI 

PUTE 88. HIBISCUS OCULIROSEUS 

PUTE 89. CORNUS OFFICINALIS 

PLATE 90. OPUNTIA LASIACANTHA 



CONTENTS 



Plate 91. COTONEASTER SIMONSII 

PLATE 92. ECHEVERIA NODULOSA 

PLATE 93. HELIANTHUS ORGYALIS 

Plate 94, SYMPHORICARPOS ALBUS LAEVIGATUS 

PLATE 95. SINNINGIA SPECIOSA 

PLATE 96. STYLOPHORUM DIPHYLLUM 

PLATE 97. ARONIA ARBUTIFOLIA 

PLATE 98. HAMAMELiS JAPONICA 

PLATE 99. HIBISCUS MOSGHEUTOS 

PLATE 100. SOBRALIA SESSILIS 



ADDISONIA 



COLORED ILLUSTRATIONS 

AND 

POPULAR DESCRIPTIONS 

OF 

PLANTS 



Volume 3 



Number 3 



SEPTEMBER, 1918 




PUBLISHED BY 

THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN 

(ADDISON BROWN FUND) 
SEPTEMBER 30. 1918 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



A bequest made to the New York Botanical Garden by its late 
President, Judge Addison Brown, established the 

ADDISON BROWN FUND 

"the income and accumulations from which shall be applied to the 
founding and publication, as soon as practicable, and to the 
maintenance (aided by subscriptions therefor), of a high-class 
magazine bearing my name, devoted exclusively to the illustration 
by <;olored plates of the plants of the United States and its terri- 
torial possessions, and of other plants flowering in said Garden or 
its conservatories; with suitable descriptions in popular language, 
and any desirable notes and synonomy, and a brief statement 
of the known properties and uses of the plants illustrated." 

The preparation and publication of the work have been referred 
to Dr. John H. Barnhart, Bibliographer, and Mr. George V. Nash, 
Head Gardener. 

Addisonia is published as a quarterly magazine, in March, June, 
September, and December. Each part consists of ten colored plates 
with accompanying letterpress. The subscription price is $10 
annually, four parts constituting a volume. The parts will not 
be sold separately. 

Address : 

THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN 
BRONX PARK 

NEW YORK CITY 

Subscnbers are advised to bind each volume of ADDISONIA as 
completed, in order to avoid possible loss or misplacement of the parts; 
nearly the whole remainder of the edition of Volumes 1 and 2 has 
been made up into complete volumes, and but few separate parts 
can be supplied. New subscriptions will be accepted only as includ- 
ing the first volumes. 



PLATE 101 



ADDISONIA 




MLLatcm. 



CORNUS MAS 



Addisonia 41 

(Plate 101) 
CORNUS MAS UBR>*^;^ 

Cornelian Cherry j^.j ^ .. — . 

Native of southern Europe and Asia Minor <3,-.«.)up« 

Family Cornac^a^ Dogwood Family 

Cornus Mas L. Sp. PI. 117. 1753. 

A shrub or small tree, of dense growth, up to twenty feet tall. 
The young branchlets are minutely appressed-pubescent, in age 
becoming glabrous. The leaves are opposite, the petioles a quarter 
inch long or less; the blades, which are up to three inches long and 
two inches wide, are elliptic to ovate, acuminate into a usually 
obtuse apex, at the base commonly rounded or sometimes cuneate, 
and with both surfaces appressed-pubescent, the lower paler and 
with tufts of ashen hairs in the axils. The yellow flowers, in which 
the sepals, petals and stamens are usually in fours, appear before 
the leaves, and are in opposite clusters of a dozen or so, terminating 
short branchlets, each cluster subtended by an involucre of four 
broadly elliptic brownish obtuse bracts which are appressed-pubes- 
cent. The pedicels and calyx-tube, the latter adherent to the 
ovary, are appressed-hairy. The calyx-lobes are small and tri- 
angular. The lanceolate petals are spreading or somewhat reflexed. 
The stamens are shorter than the petals and alternate with them. 
The scarlet fruit is about three quarters of an inch long. 

In the latter part of April or early May, in the neighborhood of 
New York City, the flowers of this plant appear, the absence of 
the foliage at that time making the flowers all the more conspicuous. 
The bright flowers are followed by a dark green fohage, which, in 
contrast with the scarlet fruit of the later months, again makes of 
this plant a most striking object. It is effective as an individual 
specimen or for mass planting. The specimen from which the 
illustration was prepared has been in the collections of the New 
York Botanical Garden since 1906. 

The fruit though edible is not palatable, but is sometimes used in 
the countries where it grows naturally as a substitute for olives. 
It is also employed there for preserves, and is said to be made use of 
by the Turks for flavoring sherbet. 

This species is closely related to another, Cornus officinalis, of 
Japan, which was illustrated at plate 89 of this work. The tufts 
of hairs in the leaf-axils of this are ashen, readily distinguishing it 
from the other in which the hair-tufts are brown. 

Ge;org^ V. Nash. 

Expi^ANATioN OP Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering branch. Fig. 2, — Flower, X 4. 
Fig. 3. — Fruiting branch. 



. IL'' 



PLATE 102 



ADDISONIA 




ELcJ^ 



SOLIDAGO SQUARROSA 



Addisonia 43 

(Plate 102) 

SOLIDAGO SQUARROSA 
Ragged Goldenrod 

Southeastern Canada and eastern United States. 
Family Carduac^ae; Thistle Family 

Solidago squarrosa Muhl. Cat. 76. 1813. 

Solidago confertiflora Nutt. Jour. Acad. Phila. 7: 102. 1834. 

A perennial plant with a radiculose stout rootstock. The stem is 
erect, five feet tall or less, pale or more often tinged with red or 
purple, finely and often copiously pubescent, glabrate and terete or 
nearly so below, permanently pubescent and ridged above, simple 
below the inflorescence, or individually or exceptionally branched. 
The leaves are alternate, and rather conspicuous. The blades are 
various, thickish, deep green above, paler and finely lined beneath, 
finely pubescent on the principal veins, especially beneath, and 
ciliate; those of the basal and lower cauline leaves obovate, oval, 
elliptic, or ovate, narrowed into petiole-like bases, with stouter 
midribs of equal length or shorter, coarsely, often doubly or ir- 
regularly, serrate; those of the upper cauline leaves much smaller 
than those of the lower, oblanceolate, elliptic, or lanceolate, mostly 
acute or short-acuminate, shallowly toothed or entire, narrowed into 
short petiole-like bases or sessile; those of the inflorescence (bracts 
subtending the panicle-branches) much reduced. The heads are 
few or several together, on short ascending approximate or distant 
branches which form a terminal elongate thyrsus. The involucres 
are campanulate, about a third of an inch long. The bracts of the 
involucre are in several series, decidedly imbricate; the outer ones 
are ovate to lanceolate, acute or obtuse ; the inner narrowly elliptic 
to linear-elhptic, or slightly broadened upward, or nearly linear, 
obtuse; all with spreading or recurved green tips, ciliolate, the ex- 
posed parts more or less pubescent. The ray-flowers are conspicu- 
ous, nine to sixteen in number, with yellow elliptic ligules a sixth of 
an inch long or more. The disk-flowers are numerous, with yellow 
5-lobed corollas about one fourth of an inch long divided into a 
cylindric tube, a larger narrowly funnelform throat and the lobes; 
the lobes are ovate or ovate-lanceolate, thick-margined. The 
anthers are whitish, united in a ring, with lanceolate tips, each sac 
acuminate at the base. The filaments are slender-filiform, as long 
as the anthers or longer. The hypanthium is glabrous, longitudi- 
nally striate. The style is filiform, glabrous. The stigmas are 
subulate or lanceolate-subulate. The achene is ribbed, glabrous, 
narrowed at the base, more or less contracted at the apex. The 
pappus consists of numerous white or nearly white bristles several 
times as long as the achene. 



44 Addisonia 

Among our hundred odd kinds of goldenrods the species here 
illustrated is wholly distinctive. It falls within a group, which 
includes only two or three other species, characterized chiefly by 
the spreading or recurved green tips of the bracts of the involucre; 
but it is quite easily distinguishable from its near relatives. 

This plant was detected by Muhlenberg in Lancaster County, 
Pennsylvania, in the early part of the past century, and was first 
mentioned by him in his "Catalogus plantarum Americae septen- 
trionalis" in 1813. It is such a clear-cut species that only once was 
there any confusion concerning it so that it w^as named a second 
time. 

The geographic range of this goldenrod extends from New Bruns- 
wick and Ontario southward to Georgia, in the Piedmont and 
mountain regions. It has not been found in the Coastal Plain. 
The altitudinal distribution extends from near sea-level to several 
thousand feet in the Alleghenies. 

Its favorite habitat is the steep or at least sloping rocky banks 
of streams, where at the height of its flowering season it quite 
eclipses all its associates. It is an erect plant with a strict in- 
florescence; but does not suggest stiffness in habit. Its large con- 
spicuously clean deep-green leaves, which are usually wholly free 
from the fungous diseases so common on the foliage of many kinds 
of goldenrod, and its erect narrow plumes of bright-yellow flowers 
are particularly attractive to the eye. 

The specimens from which the accompanying illustration was 
made were collected near the southern end of Lake Oscawana, 
Putnam County, New York, in open woods on a rocky hillside. 

John K. Smali<. 

Explanation OF Plate. Fig. 1. — Inflorescence. Fig. 2. — Flowering head, X 
2. Fig. 3. — Lower leaf. 



I 



PLATE 103 



ADDISONIA 




CALLICARPA JAPONICA 



Addisonia 45 

(Plate 103) 

CALLICARPA JAPONICA 

Japanese Callicarpa 

Native of Japan 
Family Verbena cE as Vervain Family 

Callicarpa japonica Thunb. Fl. Jap. 60. 1784. 

A shrub up to five feet tall, the purplish young branches and di- 
visions of the inflorescence stellate-pubescent, the hairs on the 
former early deciduous. The leaves are opposite and with petioles 
a quarter inch long or less. The blades are elliptic, acute at the 
base and acuminate at the apex into a long point, and are glabrous 
on both surfaces; they measure up to three inches long and an inch 
and a half wide, and on the new vigorous shoots they are often larger; 
the margins are commonly entire at the base, becoming serrate 
above, the long apex usually however without teeth. The flowers 
are generally rose-pink, on short pedicels, and are borne rather 
numerously in axillary cymose clusters. The calyx is short, its 
teeth short and rounded. The bell-shaped corolla is about an 
eighth of an inch long, its four spreading lobes rounded. The 
stamens are much exserted from the corolla and bear bright yellow 
anthers. The fruit is an eighth to three sixteenths of an inch in 
diameter and of a bright violet color. 

A most desirable shrub on account of the unusual color of its 
fruit which is borne in great abundance. It is found wild in the 
mountains of Japan in wooded areas. It thrives in the latitude of 
New York City, and is rarely damaged by cold. If, however, it is 
injured during the winter it sends up in the spring new shoots from 
the root which flower and bear fruit the same year. It may be 
readily propagated by seeds, in spring or summer by greenwood 
cuttings under glass, and by hardwood cuttings and by layers. 
The specimen from which the illustration was prepared has been 
in the collections of the New York Botanical Garden since 1895. 

Callicarpa is found in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, 
Austraha, the islands of the Pacific, and in North and Central 
America. Its known species are about thirty-five, of which one is 
Callicarpa americana, a native of the southeastern United States, 
where it is known as French mulberry. 

George V. Nash 

Explanation op Plat^. Fig. 1. — Fruiting branch. Fig. 2. — Flowers. 
Fig. 3.— Flower, X 4. 



PLATE 104 



ADDISONIA 




ASTER LAEVIS 



I 



Addisonia 47 

(Plate 104) 

ASTER LAEVIS 
Smooth Aster 

Native of the eastern and middle United States and Canada 
Family CarduacKae; Thisti,^ Family 

Aster laevis I,. Sp. PI. 876. 1753. 

A firmly erect, little branched, perennial herb, commonly two to 
three feet high. The entire plant is very smooth and glabrous and 
more or less glaucous or glaucescent, appearing of a pale green 
color. The thickish or somewhat fleshy leaves are oblong-lanceolate 
varying to oblanceolate and, more rarely, broadly ovate, and are 
entire or subserrate, and slightly roughened along the edges; the 
apex is acute or somewhat obtuse; at full size they are commonly 
three to five inches long. Those low on the stem are narrowed into 
winged petioles; those higher up are sessile by a heart-shaped partly 
clasping base, and, by gradual reduction along the flowering 
branches, pass into the firm subulate bracts of the inflorescence. 
The heads are one inch or more broad, and are terminal on firm 
bracteolate branchlets along the branches of a close panicle. The 
involucre is campanulate, its whitish-coriaceous imbricated bracts 
having hardened acutish tips. The broadish rays, fifteen to thirty in 
number, vary in color from deep blue to violet ; the rather prominent 
disc is clear yellow, changing to purplish in age. The achenes are 
glabrous, or nearly so, and are crowned with a tawny pappus. 

No one well knowing our asters in their native haunts will deny 
to this one a place among those that uphold their aster lineage 
with especial attributes of grace and beauty. It is a firmly up- 
standing plant, and with something of distinction in its bearing 
even before its flowers display their trim perfection of form and the 
bright purity of their deep sky blue or paler violet. 

It is appropriate that this, of all asters, should bear the name 
Aaster laevis — the smooth aster. Its smoothness is of a quality 
that needs no veriflcation of the touch to make it instantly true to 
the eye. An almost waxy firmness gives a sort of resistant pliancy 
to the leaves which, with the herbage as a whole, are veiled with a 
faint whitish bloom, like a plum or grape, that when pressed off 
by a touch, reveals the bright light green of the shining surface 
beneath. 

Ivike most asters this species has its divergent forms, some of 
which have been given distinctive names. But no one of these 



48 Addisonia 

variants seems to have succeeded in detaching itself very success- 
fully from the controlling individuality of the true plant which 
blends all together into one general species. 

This is an an aster mainly of dry open ground, sometimes group- 
ing itself closely on sandy levels, but more often of freer growth along 
fields and woodsides or, among inland hills, scattered, as the soil 
may permit, along stony roadside banks. 

In the east its distribution extends from Pennsylvania and New 
Jersey to the coast region of New York and on through New England 
into Maine; thence it ranges to Ontario, and far towards the north- 
west, and south, it is said, to New Mexico and Louisiana. 

E. P. BlCKNELL. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Portion of flowering stem. Fig. 2. — In- 
volucre, X 2. Fig. 3. — Lower leaf. 



PLATE 105 



ADDISONIA 




OPUNTIA OPUNTIA 



Addisonia 49 

(Plate 105) 

OPUNTIA OPUNTU 
Eastern Prickly Pear 

Native oj the eastern United States 

Family Cactacejas Cactus Family 

Cactus Opuntia L. Sp. PI. 468. 1753. 

Cactus Opuntia nana DC. PI. Succ. Hist. 2: pi. 138 [A]. 1799. 

Opuntia vulgaris Haw. Syn. PI. Succ. 190. 1812. Not Opuntia vulgaris Mill. 

1768. 
Cactus humifusus Raf. Ann. Nat. 15. 1820. 
Opuntia humifusa Raf. Med. Fl. U. S. 2: 247. 1830. 
Opuntia mesacantha Raf. Bull. Bot. Seringe 216. 1830. 
Opuntia cespitosa Raf. BuU. Bot. Seringe 216. 1830. 
Opuntia intermedia Salm-Dyck, Hort. Dyck. 364. 1834. 
Opuntia nana Visiani, Fl. Dalmatica 3: 143. 1852. 
Opuntia Rafinesquei* Engelm. Proc. Am. Acad. 3: 295. 1856. 
Opuntia vulgaris Rafinesquei A. Gray, Man. Bot. ed. 2. 136. 1856. 

A prostrate cactus, often forming large patches, some of the 
joints erect or ascending, the roots long and fibrous. Its joints are 
light green and glabrous, faintly shining or when old dull, normally 
orbicular, elliptic, or obovate-elliptic, from two to four inches long 
and about one third of an inch thick; when growing in shade some of 
the joints may elongate and become six inches to ten inches long 
and not more than two inches wide. The areoles are small, round, 
and slightly elevated; the leaves, which fall away soon after the 
joints are fully grown, are awl-shaped and about one quarter of an 
inch long. The glochids are short, yellowish or brown. The plant 
is either quite spineless or some of the areoles bear a needle-shaped 
brownish or nearly white spine from half an inch to about two inches 
long; rarely two spines are borne at a few areoles; seedling plants, 
however, have several small spines at the areoles. The flowers, 
which appear in June or July in the north and in May in the south, 
are borne solitary at areoles on the edges of the joints; they vary 
from about two inches to about three and one half inches broad 
when fully expanded; the eight to ten petals are obovate, apiculate, 
bright yellow or sometimes with orange or red bases; the numerous 
yellow stamens are shorter than the petals and spread widely when 
the flower is fully open, when a slight shock causes them to incurve 
about the style; the obconic ovary is about an inch long and bears 
a few areoles like those of the joints, with similar glochids; the 
slender style is about as long as the stamens, and is topped by a 
white, several-lobed stigma. The fruit is a red, oblong to obovoid, 

* Sometimes spelled Rafinesquiana, 



50 Addisonia 

juicy and edible berry, from one inch to two inches long, and con- 
tains many black seeds about one sixth of an inch broad. 

This plant is widely distributed in the eastern United States and 
is the most northeastern in geographic range of any species of the 
cactus family. It is frequent on coastal sand dunes from eastern 
Massachusetts south to Virginia and occurs locally in sand or on 
rocks westward to Illinois and Missouri and southward to Georgia 
and Alabama. It has long been established in the mountains of 
northern Italy and of Switzerland, where it has been called Opuntia 
nana ; plants sent to us under that name from the famous Hanbury 
Gardens at La Mortola, Italy, appear to be identical with wild 
ones of the vicinity of New York. 

In botanical literature the species has often been described under 
the name Opuntia vulgaris Miller, but that name properly belongs 
to an altogether different, tall, erect cactus of wide distribution in 
eastern South America. 

Races, or individual plants, of Opuntia Opuntia differ somewhat 
in size and shape of the joints and of the fruit, and in size of the 
flowers, and are with or without spines. Some of these have been 
regarded as distinct species or varieties by various authors and the 
synonymy of the plant is quite extensive, the names cited above 
being only the most important which have been applied to it. It 
has been suggested that plants with orange-based petals may be 
specifically distinct from those with pure yellow petals, although 
otherwise alike. We have grown the plant at the New York Botani- 
cal Garden from many localities and have observed it at many 
others. It grows naturally quite abundantly on rock out-crops 
within the New York Botanical Garden. 

The plant from which our illustration was made was sent by 
Mr. E. P. Bicknell, in 1904, from Nantucket Island, Massachusetts. 

N. L. Brixton. 



ADDISONIA 



PLATE 106 




ILEX SERRATA ARGUTIDENS 



Addisonia 51 

« 

(Plate 106) 

ILEX SERRATA ARGUTIDENS 

Japanese Sharp-toothed Winterberry 

Native of Japan 

Family Aquifoliaceak Holi<y Family 

Ilex argutidens Miq. Versl. Med. Akad. Wetensch. II. 2: 84. 1868. 
Ilex serrata argutidens Rehder, Bailey, Cyclop. Am. Hort. 798. 1900. 

A slender shurb up to twelve or fifteen feet tall, the young branch- 
lets purplish and minutely pubescent. The glabrous leaves are 
alternate, on short petioles a quarter inch long or less. The blades 
are elhptic, up to two inches long and an inch wide, acute at the 
base, and acute or acuminate at the apex; the lower surface is paler 
than the upper; the margins are rather irregularly serrate. The 
flowers, of a pale rose color, have the sepals, petals and stamens 
usually in fours, and are borne commonly singly in the axils of the 
leaves. The sepals are very short, the petals broadly oval and 
spreading. The stamens are shorter than the petals. The fruit, 
about three sixteenths of an inch in diameter, is a bright red. 

This Japanese holly is closely related to the common winter- 
berry of our swamps, resembling it much in habit; the fruit is of a 
similar color, but smaller, making up for this by the profusion in 
which it is borne. The specimen from which the illustration was 
prepared has been in the fruticetum collection of the New York 
Botanical Garden since 1895. 

The genus Ilex contains nearly three hundred species, mainly 
distributed in America and Asia, with a few in Austraha, Oceanica, 
Europe, and Africa. In the eastern United States there are about 
fifteen species; six of these are evergreen, the American holly, 
Ilex opaca, extending as far north as Massachusetts, and the ink- 
berry, Ilex glabra, to Nova Scotia, while the remainder of the ever- 
green species do not range north of Virginia. Some of our most 
decorative fruiting shrubs are found in this genus, and one. Ilex 
crtnata, of Japan, is one of the best broad-leaved evergreens. 

George V. Nash. 

Explanation op Plats. Fig. 1. — Fruiting branch. Fig, 2. — Flowers. 
Fig. 3.— Flower, X 5. 



PLATE 107 



ADDISONIA 




OTHONNA CRASSIFOLIA 



Addisonia 53 

(Plate 107) 

OTHONNA CRASSIFOLIA 
Thick-leaved Othonna 

Native oj south Africa 
Family Carduaceas Thisti^e Family 

Othonna crassifolia Harvey; Harvey & Sonder, Fl. Cap. 3: 336. 1865. 

A tufted light green somewhat glaucous perennial succulent 
plant, with the lower leaves short and crowded, those on the stems 
more scattered and longer. The leaves are cylindric and usually 
curved, acute, from a quarter to three eighths of an inch in diameter, 
the lower ones up to two inches long and commonly purple-tipped, 
those on the spreading shoots longer and usually entirely green. 
The flowering stems are up to eight inches long, slender, somewhat 
branched; they arise from a whorl of leaves and commonly bear 
two to four flower-heads on long peduncles, and often one or two 
leaves. The heads are up to one inch broad, with a dozen or more 
ray-flowers and numerous disc-flowers. The corollas of the pis- 
tillate ray-flowers are ligulate, reflexed-spreading, bright yellow; 
the corolla of the disc-flowers is cylindric-bell-shaped, five-lobed, 
and of a deeper yellow. 

A decorative little plant for the temperate house, especially use- 
ful in rockeries. Potted plants may also be plunged for the sum- 
mer in a sunny spot in the garden, where they will soon make a 
vigorous growth and bloom freely. The main body of the plant is 
prostrate; the flowering stems, ascending for six or eight inches and 
lightly veiled with a whitish bloom, and the bright yellow flowers 
make a pleasing combination. It has a long flowering period. 
The specimen from which the illustration was prepared was secured 
by exchange with the Royal Gardens, Kew, England, in 1902, and 
has flowered repeatedly in the collections of the New York Botanical 
Garden. 

Georgia V. Nash. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering stem. Fig. 2. — Ray-flower, X 3. 
Fig. 3. — Disc-flower, X 5. 



PLATE 108 



ADDISONIA 





MAGNOLIA KOBUS 



Addisonia 55 

(Plate 108) 

MAGNOLIA KOBUS 
Thurber's Magnolia 

Native oj Japan 
Family Magnouac^ae Magnoua Family 

Magnolia Kobus D. C. Syst. 1 : 456. 1818. 

A tree with a narrow pyramidal outline, said to attain in a wild 
state a height of eighty feet, but in cultivation of much lower stature 
and flowering when only twelve or fifteen feet tall. The branchlets 
are slender and glabrous. The alternate leaves are glabrous, with 
the exception sometimes of yellowish hairs on the bases of the peti- 
oles, which rarely exceed a half inch in length. The blades, measur- 
ing up to six inches long, but commonly under four, and usually 
under two inches broad, are obovate-cuneate, chartaceous, with the 
venation conspicuous, and the margins entire; the apex is obtuse or 
abruptly acuminate, and they are narrowed from the middle into 
a short petiole. The bud-scales are clothed with long yellowish 
appressed hairs. The flowers, which appear normally before the 
leaves, terminate the branches, are white, sometimes flushed with 
rose at the centre, and have a diameter of four or five inches. The 
sepals are green, narrow, and do not exceed half the length of the 
thin petals, which are oblanceolate, obtuse, and two to two and a 
half inches long. The stamens are yellow, much shorter than 
the petals. The fruit is two inches or more long, unsymmetric, 
usually curved. The seeds are orange. 

This magnolia, while not as showy as some of the others, is valua- 
ble for its symmetric habit of growth and its great hardiness. Its 
flowers appear before the leaves, late in April or early May, rarely at 
a later date. While not borne as profusely as in some of the other 
species, their white color makes them attractive and conspicuous. 
The fruit is usually mature about September, the orange seeds 
adding an attraction. The specimen from which the illustration 
was prepared has been in the collections of the New York Botanical 
Garden for about fifteen years. 

This species is quite common in the forests of Japan, was in- 
troduced into the United States by Thomas Hogg, and distributed 
from the Parsons' Nurseries as Magnolia Thurberi, under which 
name it is still sometimes referred to in horticultural literature. 

The genus Magnolia is widely distributed in the northern hemi- 
sphere, being found in eastern North America, including the West 



56 Addisonia 

Indies, in Mexico, and in the Himalayas and eastern Asia; it con- 
tains about thirty-five species. Some of the species are evergreen, 
but the greater part are deciduous. In some the flowers appear 
before the leaves, while in others the blossoms come with or after 
the foliage. It is interesting to note that the species under culti- 
vation, in which the flowers appear before the leaves, are of Asiatic 
origin. Seven species are found in the United States, all in the east- 
ern part. Of these, one. Magnolia grandiflora, has evergreen foliage, 
and in another, Magnolia virginiana, the foliage is evergreen in the 
south and deciduous in the north; the remainder of the species have 
deciduous leaves. 

George V. Nash. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering branch. Fig. 2. — Fruiting 
branch. 



PLATE 109 



ADDISONIA 




VA ixUm 



CRASSULA PORTULACEA 



Addisonia - 57 

(Plate 109) 

CRASSULA PORTULACEA 

Tree Crassula 

Native of south Africa 
Family Crassui^aceae; Stone crop Family 

Crassula portulacea Lam. Encyc. 2: 172. 1786. 

A succulent intricately branched shrub, or sometimes a dwarf 
tree with a well-defined trunk, up to six feet or more tall. The bark 
on the old stems is grayish-brown, marked with rings and irregularly 
shaped figures; the ultimate divisions are yellowish-brown. The 
sessile opposite fleshy leaves are a rather dark green, at and near the 
margins marked with dull reddish-brown, and are decussately ar- 
ranged in two to six pairs at the branchlet-ends; they are obovate, 
usually more or less inequilateral, obtuse, up to two inches long and 
one and a quarter inches wide. The flowering stems are pink, arising 
from the summit of the branchlets, and bear trichotomous cymes of 
pale rose flowers, the color deepest toward the tips of the petals. 
The flowers are a half to three quarters of an inch broad, the parts 
usually in fives; the sepals are very short; the petals are oblong- 
lanceolate, acute, spreading; the stamens are alternate with and 
shorter than the petals, with deep rose anthers; the pistils are as- 
cending, white flushed with rose, shorter than the stamens. 

Like all south African plants, this is not hardy in the latitude of 
New York City, requiring in the winter time the protection of a 
cool house, where it may be grown with cacti and other succulent 
plants requiring rather cool night temperatures. Complaints 
have been received at the New York Botanical Garden that the 
plant never flowers. This is true of small specimens, but when the 
plant becomes large and mature it is one of the freest of bloomers, 
and the large specimen in the collections of the Garden, from which 
the illustration was prepared, is an attractive object when in full 
bloom, which occurs usually in January or February. 

In its home it grows usually on hillsides among other shrubs. 
Its roots are eaten by the Hottentots under the name "T'Karchay." 

The genus Crassula contains about two hundred species, mainly 
inhabitants of the Cape of Good Hope, with a few in tropical 
Africa, Australia, Madagascar, and China. 

George V. Nash. 

Explanation op Pirate. Fig, 1. — Flowering stem. Fig. 2. — Flower, cut 
open, X 2. 



PLATE no 



ADDISONIA 





VIBURNUM PRUNIFOLIUM 



Addisonia 59 

(Plate 110) 

VIBURNUM PRUNIFOLIUM 
Black Haw 

Family Caprifoliaceae;. Honeysuckle; Family 

Native of the eastern and central United States 

Viburnum prunifolium L. Sp. PI. 268. 1753. 

A densely branched large shrub or small tree, occasionally reaching 
a height of thirty feet and a trunk diameter of one foot. The young 
bark is smoothish and of a purple-brown color, but that of the older 
trunks becomes blackish, much fissured and somewhat scaly; 
internally, it is rusty brown and the inner surface is roughish with 
small oblique bast bundles. That of the root is wholly brown and 
is soft-scaly on the outer surface. It is bitter and of a peculiar 
strong odor, slightly resembling that of valerian. The wood is hard, 
tough and strong. The branches, like the leaves, are opposite and, 
when young, are apt to be thornlike. The leaves, borne on short, 
slender, reddish petioles, and one to three inches long, are approxi- 
mately oval in form, with a rounded or shghtly produced base and 
an obtuse, or occasionally very slightly pointed summit; the margin 
is very finely toothed and the venation is reddish. The white 
flowers are borne in nearly flat compound cymes, two to four and a 
half inches broad, on very short stems, the flowers also on short 
stems; in furit, the branches of the cyme elongate considerably. 
The corolla is wheel-shaped, about one third of an inch broad and 
deeply 5-lobed, and bears a stamen of about its own length in each 
sinus. The fruits are about one third of an inch long and about 
two thirds as broad, oval and compressed, and are tipped with the 
remains of the calyx. When ripe, they are black, with a thin 
coating of whitish wax, giving them a bluish-black appearance; 
each contains a single flat stone, slightly convex on one side. 

The black haw is one of the most ornamental of our wild shrubs, 
blooming in May, when it beautifies the fence rows and hedges and 
the borders of woodlands with its profuse masses of snowy-white 
flowers. It is not infrequently planted for ornament. The fruits 
ripen in the late fall, when they are much eaten by children. They 
are agreeably sweet after being acted upon by frost, although al- 
ways rather dry. Under primitive conditions, they were a favorite 
fruit of bears. The bark, especially that of the root, is a much- 
used medicine, prized by practical physicians for its anti-spasmodic 
properties. It has long been official in the United States Phar- 
macopoeia. 

H. H. RusBY. 

Expi,ANATiON OP Plate. Fig. l. — Fruiting branch. Fig. 2. — Flowering 
branch. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 1 



PUTE 


1. 


PLATE 


2. 


PLATE 


3. 


PLATE 


4. 


PLATE 


5. 


PLATE 


6. 


PLATE 


7. 


PLATE 


8. 


PLATE 


9. 


PLATE 


10. 


PLATE 


11. 


PLATE 


12. 


PLATE 


13. 


PLATE 


14. 


PLATE 


15. 


PLATE 


16. 


PLATE 


17. 


PLATE 


18. 


PLATE 


19. 


PLATE 


20. 



RHODODENDRON CAROLINIANUM 
CASSIA POLYPHYLLA 
ROBINIA KELSEYI 
PACHYPHYTUM LONGIFOLIUM 
BEGONIA COWELLII 
ECHEVERIA SETOSA 
COLUMNEA GLORIOSA 
FOUQUIERIA FORMOSA 
MAXILLARIA RINGENS 
NOPALEA AUBERI 
CRINUM AMERICANUM 
CLETHRA ALNIFOLIA 
ECHEVERIA CARNICOLOR 
MINA LOBATA 

CLERODENDRON TRICHOTOMUM 
NOTYLIA SAGITTIFERA 
EXOGONIUM MICRODACTYLUM 
VITEX AGNUS-CASTUS 
OPUNTIA MACRORHIZA 
COMMELINA COMMUNIS 



PLATE 


21. 


PLATE 


22. 


PLATE 


23. 


PLATE 


24. 


PLATE 


25. 


PLATE 


26. 


PLATE 


27. 


PLATE 


28. 


PLATE 


29. 


PLATE 


30. 


PLATE 


31A, 


PLATE 


31B. 


PLATE 


32. 


PLATE 


33. 


PLATE 


34. 


PLATE 


35. 


PLATE 


36. 


PLATE 


37. 


PUTE 


38. 


PLATE 


39. 


PLATE 


40. 



ADOXA MOSCHATELLINA 
SISYRINCHIUM BERMUDIANA 
COLUMNEA HIRTA 
PEDILANTHUS SMALLII 
CREMNOPHILA NUTANS 
PITHECOLOBIUM GUADALUPENSE 
ANTHU.RIUM GRANDIFOLIUM 
EPIDENDRUM PALEACEUM 
BEGONIA WILLIAMSII 
ONCIDIUM UROPHYLLUM 
SEDUM DIVERSIFOLIUM 
SEDUM HUMIFUSUM 
CATASETUM SCURRA 
CHIONODOXA LUCILIAE GIGANTEA 
AGAVE SUBSIMPLEX • 
DASYSTEPHANA PORPHYRIO 
RHUS HIRTA DISSECTA 
CYMOPHYLLUS FRASERI 
OPUNTIA VULGARIS 
TILLANDSIA SUBLAXA 
ECHEVERIA AUSTRALIS 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2 



PLATE 41. 


PLATE 


42. 


PLATE 


43. 


PLATE 


44. 


PLATE 


45. 


PLATE 


46. 


PUTE 


47. 


PLATE 


48. 


PUTE 


49. 


PLATE 


50. 


PUTE 


51. 


PUTE 


52. 


PLATE 


53. 


PUTE 


54. 


PUTE 


55. 


PLATE 


56. 


PUTE 


57. 


PUTE 


58. 


PUTE 


59. 


PLATE 


60. 



NOLINA TEXANA PUTE 61. 
TRICHOSTERIQMA BENEDICTUM PUTE 62. 

BENTHAMIA JAPONtCA PUTE 63. 

DIRCAEA MAGNIFICA PLATE 64. 

BUDDLEIA DAVID1 PUTE 65. 

GONGORA TRUNCATA ALBA PLATE 66. 

WERCKLEOCEREUS GLABER PUTE 67, 

DUDLEYA BRANDEGEI PUTE 68. 

ABELIA GRANDIFLORA PUTE 69. 

PEPEROMIA OBTUSIFOLIA PLATE 70. 

SOLIDAGO JUNCEA PUTE 71. 

ECHEVERIA MULTICAULIS PUTE 72. 

CATASETUM VIRIDIFLAVUM PUTE 73. 

SAGITTARIA UTIFOLIA PUTE 74. 

BACCHARIS HALIMIFOLIA PUTE 75. 

XANTHISMA TEXANUM PUTE 76. 

SEDUM BOURGAEI PUTE 77. 

CIMICIFUGA SIMPLEX PUTE 78. 

FEIJOA SELLOWIANA PUTE 79. 

ASTER AMETHYSTINUS PUTE 80. 



HARRISIA GRACILIS 
EPIDENDRUM OBLONQATUM 
AESCULUS PARVIFLORA 
MICRAMPELIS LOBATA 
BOMAREA EDULIS 
ASTER TATARICUS 
PACHYPHYTUM BRACTEOSUM 
HARRISIA MARTINI 
ONCIDIUM PUBES 
RAPHIOLEPIS UMBELLATA 
ROSA "SILVER MOON" 
DENDROBIUM ATROVIOLACEUM 
CENTRADENIA FLORIBUNDA 
PIAROPUS AZUREUS 
SOLIDAGO ALTISSIMA 
PENTAPTERYGIUM SERPENS 
FREYLINIA LANCEOLATA 
ANNESLIA TWEEDIEI 
CRASSULA OUADRIFIDA 
ASTER CORDIFOLIUS 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 3 



PLATE 


81. 


PLATE 


82. 


PLATE 


83A 


PUTE 


838 


PUTE 


84. 


PLATE 


85. 


PUTE 


86. 


PLATE 


87. 


PLATE 


88. 


PUTE 


89. 


PLATE 


90. 



ARONIA ATROPURPUREA PUTE 91. 

ASTER NOVAE-ANGLIAE PLATE 92. 

GYMNOCALYCIUM MULTIFLORUM PLATE 93. 

GYMNOCALYCIUM MOSTII PLATE 94. 
EUONYMUS ALATA 

DIOSPYROS VIRGINIANA PLATE 95. 

LEPADENA MARGINATA PLATE 96. 

MAACKIA AMURENSIS BUERGERI PLATE 97. 

HIBISCUS OCULIROSEUS PLATE 98. 

CORNUS OFFICINALIS PLATE 99. 

OPUNTIA LASIACANTHA PLATE 100 



COTONEASTER SIMONSII 
ECHEVERIA NODULOSA 
HELIANTHUS ORGYALIS 
SYMPHORICARPOS ALBUS 

LAEVIGATUS 
SINNINGIA SPECIOSA 
STYLOPHORUM DIPHYLLUM 
ARONIA ARBUTIFOLIA 
HAMAMELIS JAPONICA 

HIBISCUS MOSCHEUTOS 

SOBRALIA SESSILIS 



CONTENTS 



Plate 101. CORNUS MAS 

PLATE 102. SOLI DAGO SQUARROSA 

PLATE 103. CALLICARPA JAPONICA 

PLATE 104. ASTER LAEVIS 

PLATE 105. OPUNTIA OPUNTIA 

PLATE 106. ILEX SERRATA ARGUTIDENS 

PLATE 107. OTHONNA CRASSIFOLIA 

PLATE 108. MAGNOLIA KOBUS 

PLATE 109. GRASSULA PORTULACEA 

PLATE 110. VIBURNUM PRUNIFOLIUM 



J 

I 

i 



ADDISONIA 



f 



COLORED rULUSTRATIONS 

AND 

POPULAR DESCRIPTIONS 

OF 

PLANTS 



Volume 3 Number 4 



DECEMBER, 1918 




PUBLISHED BY d 

THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN ] 

(ADDISON BROWN FUND) 

DECEMBER 30. 1918 j 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



A bequest made to the New York Botanical Garden by its late 
President, Judge Addison Brown, established the 

ADDISON BROWN FUND 

"the income and accumulations from which shall be applied to the 
founding and publication, as soon as practicable, and to the 
maintenance (aided by subscriptions therefor), of a high-class 
magazine bearing my name, devoted exclusively to the illustration 
by colored plates of the plants of the United States and its terri- 
torial possessions, and of other plants flowering in said Garden or 
its conservatories; with suitable descriptions in popular language, 
and any desirable notes and synonomy, and a brief statement 
of the known properties and uses of the plants illustrated." 

The preparation and publication of the work have been referred 
to Dr. John H. Barnhart, Bibliographer, and Mr. George V. Nash, 
Head Gardener. 

Addisonia is published as a quarterly magazine, in March, June, 
September, and December. Each part consists of ten colored plates 
with accompanying letterpress. The subscription price is $10 
annually, four parts constituting a volume. The parts will not 
be sold separately. 

Address: 

THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN 
BRONX PARK 

NEW YORK CITY 

Subscribers are advised to bind each volume of ADDISONIA as 
completed, in order to avoid possible loss or misplacement of the parts; 
nearly the whole remainder of the edition of Volumes 1 and 2 has 
been made up into complete volumes, and but few separate parts 
can be supplied. New subscriptions will be accepted only as includ- 
ing the first volumes. 



PLATE in 



ADDISONIA 




SYMPHORICARPOS SYM PHORIC ARPOS 



Addisonia 61 

(Plate 111) 

SYMPHORICARPOS SYMPHORICARPOS 
Coral-berry 

Native of east-central United States 

Family Cafrifoi^iacea^ Honbysucklb Family 

Lonicera Symphoricarpos L. Sp. PI. 175, 1753. 
Symphoricarpos orbiculatus Moench, Meth. 503. 1794. 
Symphoricarpos vulgaris Michx. Fl. Bor. Am. 1: 106. 1803. 
Symphoricarpos Symphoricarpos MacM. Bull. Torrey Club 19: 15. 1892. 

A shrub, two to five feet tall, with many erect or ascending 
purplish-gray or gray branches, spreading or somewhat drooping 
pubescent branchlets, and yellow and rose flowers followed by 
coral-red fruit. The opposite leaves, softly pubescent beneath, 
have petioles less than a quarter of an inch long; the blades are 
oval, varying to ovate or nearly orbicular, acute or obtuse at apex, 
usually about one to one and a half inches long and one half to 
one inch wide, and are pale beneath. The flowers, less than an 
eighth of an inch long, are in many-flowered densely crowded 
axillary spikes, which are borne upon the young growth of the 
season ; the calyx has five triangular ciliate lobes, which in the bud 
lie as rudimentary structures about the base of the corolla and 
persist as vestiges on the apex of the fruit. The corolla is bell- 
shaped, turned obliquely upward, and somewhat inflated in the 
lower side; its tube is yellow, suffused distally with rose, and the 
triangular lobes are yellow. There are five pubescent stamens, 
which are shorter than the corolla, as is also the pubescent style. 
The fruit is pome-like, of a delicate coral-red, with an obscure 
bloom, and often an obscure purplish cast. 

Those who have tramped through the open forests of the Missis- 
sippi valley know well the coral-berry, or buck-brush as it is more 
commonly called. Through much of the year only a weed-like 
over-abundant element of the underbrush, in the autumn it becomes 
transformed. Each branchlet, bending beneath its weight of fruit, 
changes to a wand of delicate red, and as the plant bears many 
branches, which rebranch in spray-like fashion, the whole forms a 
complex and a profusion of color, making it deservedly one of 
America's favorite decorative shrubs. 

Since the leaves are opposite, the inflorescences are opposite, 
and because they occur in the axils of most leaves of a season's 
growth, and the plant is a rapid grower, the pairs of inflorescences 
are many and gradually approximate toward the apex of the stem. 
Only when young can the real structure of these be seen; in age 



C--J 



62 Addisonia 

the maturing fruits, crowded upon the shortened axis, press one 
another, and even those of the opposite spikes, into irregular stellate 
dusters. In the late autumn a few leaves still stand out stiffly, 
but through the winter, until they have shriveled and blackened, 
or the birds have eaten the fruits, there is no veil to the showiness 
of the shrub. 

The coral-berry prefers normal loam or clayey grove-like wood- 
land, frequently on the thin soil of rocky places. It occurs as a 
native plant from western New York to South Dakota, Georgia, 
and Texas, only southward crossing the Alleghanies into the Pied- 
mont flora of the Atlantic slope. It has long been cultivated and 
in many of the older settlements is a chance escape. 

Like the closely allied snowberry, figured on plate 94, and as 
might be presumed from its abundance in a wild state, this species 
is of the easiest culture. Like that, it forms suckers, and the 
mode of its propagation is the same. 

The specimen here illustrated was obtained from plants long 
grown in the New York Botanical Garden. 

Francis W. PenneivI.. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Fruiting branch. Fig. 2. — Flowering 
branch. Fig. 3.— Flower, X 5. 



^ 



PLATE 112 



ADDISONIA 




^ * 






i- 



A|£.Eaf?7I 




^jjy^jj^ 



1 



SPIRAEA THUNBERGII 



Addisonia 63 

(Plate 112) 
SPIRAEA THUNBERGII 

Thunberg's Spiraea 

Native of Japan and China 
Family Rosacea^ Rose Family 

Spiraea crenata Th.yxah.'BX.'ia.p. 210. 1784. Not Spiraea crenata h. 1753. 
Spiraea Thunbergii Siebold; Blume,Biidr. 1115. 1826. 

With its spreading arched branches, this is one of the most 
graceful of shrubs, attaining a height of five or six feet and an equal 
width, the white flowers borne in great profusion. The bark of the 
old branches is a deep chestnut-brown, while the branches of the 
year are clothed with a paler bark, and are pubescent. The glabrous 
leaves are numerous, alternate, and appear for the most part after 
the flowers; they are linear-lanceolate, up to an inch and a half 
long and three sixteenths of an inch wide, sessile or nearly so, and 
are gradually narrowed from the middle to each end; the margin 
is serrate, except at the base, with rather distant sharp teeth. The 
flowers, appearing for the most part in advance of the leaves, are 
about a third of an inch across, are on slender glabrous pedicels a 
quarter to three eighths of an inch long, and occur in sessile clusters 
of two to five on the branches of the previous year, each cluster 
subtended by several bracts. The calyx is glabrous, its five lobes 
deltoid. The petals, equal in number to the lobes of the calyx 
and alternate with them, are pure white, obovate, and much exceed 
the stamens. The pistils are five, distinct, glabrous, and develop 
into follicles which open on the inner side. 

In late April or the fore part of May, in the latitude of New York 
City, this delightful little Japanese shrub is clothed with a mantle 
of white blossoms, the spreading arched branches giving it a dainty 
grace possessed by few other shrubs. The bright green foliage of 
summer passes to orange or scarlet in the fall, making of it also an 
attractive object at that season. It is of the easiest culture, thriving 
in almost any soil of reasonable quality, but preferring conditions 
slightly moist rather than dry. As an individual specimen on the 
lawn it is of striking appearance, or it is effective in the border 
where feathery masses of white are desired. It is the first spiraea, 
as well as one of the earliest shrubs, to bloom, and this adds much 
to its value and attractiveness. It may readily be propagated 
from seeds or by green-wood cuttings under glass. The plant from 
which the illustration was prepared, has been in the New York 
Botanical Garden for many years. 

Thunberg in his Flora Japonica erroneously associated this with 



64 Addisonia 

the Spiraea crenata of Linnaeus, another and quite different plant 
occurring from southeastern Europe to the Caucasus. This error 
was detected later, and the name given to it commemorating its 
discoverer, Thunberg. 

The genus Spiraea has over seventy-five species, mainly dis- 
tributed in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, 
extending in the New World as far south as Mexico, and in Asia to 
the Himalayas. Many species are of great horticultural value, 
and may be classed in two groups: those which, Uke the present 
species, flower in the spring and early summer, and have white 
flowers borne in umbels on the wood of the previous year; and 
those which bear either white or pink blossoms, from early summer 
to fall, in corymbs or panicles on vigorous shoots of the season. 
It is evident, therefore, that pruning in the species of the first group 
should be confined to thinning, or to removing the weak wood, as 
otherwise the number of blossoms would be greatly reduced ; while 
in the second group pruning may be done more vigorously, the 
flowers coming on the shoots of the year. 

George V. Nash. 

Explanation OF Pi^xe. Fig. 1. — Flowering branch. Fig. 2. — Flower, X 4. 
Fig. 3. — Leaves. 



PLATE 113 



ADDISONIA 




■|E:-LaC7n_ 



COREOPSIS LEAVENWORTHII 



Addisonia 65 

(Plate 113) 

COREOPSIS LEAVENWORTHH 
Leavenworth's Tickseed 

Native oj peninsular Florida 
Family Carduacsa^ Thisti,© Family 

Coreopsis Leavenworthii T. & G. Fl. N. Am, 2: 346. 1842. 

An annual plant, five feet tall or less, bright green, often with a 
short-jointed caudex at the base. The stems are relatively slender, 
simple or sparingly branched and erect, or much branched near 
the base and more or less diffuse; the branches are glabrous, 
terete or longitudinally ridged when dry, and usually branched 
throughout. The leaves are opposite, glabrous, the lower ones 
with linear or narrowly spatulate blades, which are entire, or deeply 
pinnatifid with one to three pairs of narrow lateral lobes; the 
upper leaves have entire blades narrower than those of the lower 
ones. The bracts subtending the peduncles in the inflorescence 
are filiform or nearly so. The showy heads are slender-peduncled 
and erect. The involucre is double, hemispheric in anthesis, and 
persistent. The outer bracts are lanceolate-subulate to lanceolate 
or ovate-lanceolate, a twelfth of an inch long or less; the inner 
bracts are ovate, olDtuse, thrice as long as the outer ones or more, 
somewhat fleshy, and glabrous. The copiously pitted receptacle 
is convex or sometimes nearly hemispheric, bearing narrowly hnear 
bractlets. The disk is dark-brown or nearly black, about a quarter 
of an inch wide or less. The disk-corollas are numerous, narrowly 
funnelform, and less than one sixth of an inch long, with broadly 
ovate lobes. The stamens are slightly exserted, with ovate tips, the 
anthers longer than the free portion of the filaments. The ray is 
composed of about 8 flowers; the ligules are bright yellow, spread- 
ing, with blades varying from ovate to cuneate, about a half inch 
long, and obtusely three-lobed at the apex. The pappus is two 
upwardly barbed subulate awns. The achenes are roundish in 
outline, less than one sixth of an inch long, over all, the body ellip- 
soid, black, minutely punctate-cancellate, and usually sparingly 
granular-dotted. The wings are thin and translucent, each about 
as wide as the diameter of the achene-body, very finely laterally 
striate, extending above the top of the achene-body; in the sinus 
thus formed the two pappus-awns, in length about equal to the 
diameter of the achene-body, arise. 

The genus Coreopsis, well known to plant lovers through several 
species almost universally cultivated in gardens, is represented by 
not less than twenty-four native ones in the southern states east 
of the Mississippi River. As many as fourteen species grow natur- 
ally in Florida. Some of these found their way to Linnaeus before 



66 Addisonia 

the middle of the eighteenth century, while some were not dis- 
covered until the beginning of the present century. 

The species here illustrated came to notice during a period 
between these extremes, at a time when the plant treasures of 
Florida began to be discovered in increasing numbers. 

It was during the Seminole War that Dr. M. C. Leavenworth, 
a surgeon in the United States Army and an amateur botanist, 
collected specimens of various plants met with in his travels and 
sent them to Dr. John Torrey. The original specimens from which 
Coreopsis Leavenworthii was described came from the vicinity of 
Tampa Bay and near Fort Drane in what is now Marion County, 
Florida. 

Curiously enough this plant named for Dr. Leavenworth has 
nearly the same geographic range as Heliotropium Leavenworthii. 
It, however, extends a little further north in the peninsula and is 
found on some of the lower Florida Keys. Like the heliotrope 
just referred to, it is a prominent element in the flora of the low 
pinelands and marshes, and in many localities covers large areas 
to the exclusion of all other conspicuous vegetation, the countless 
myriads of heads thus forming stretches of brilliant yellow some- 
times extending as far as the eye can see. 

The specimens from which the accompanying illustration was 
made were collected by the writer in the Everglades near Cutler, 
Florida, May 22, 1918. 

John K. Smali.. 

Explanation of Pi,ate. Fig. 1. — Flowering stem. Fig. 2. — Fruit, X 7. 



PLATE 114 



ADDISONIA 




fA.B-.LoXim-^ 



ECHINACEA PURPUREA 



Addisonia 67 

(Plate 114) 
ECHINACEA PURPUREA 

Purple Cone-flower 

Native of central and south-central United States 
Family Carduaceae Thistle Family 

Rudbeckia purpurea L. Sp. PI. 907. 1753. 

Echinacea purpurea Moench, Meth. 591. 1794. 

Brauneria purpurea Britton, Mem. Torrey Club 5: 334. 1894. 

A stout, erect, perennial herb, three to five feet high. The 
stem is either smooth or rough, and frequently tinged with red; 
it may be unbranehed, bearing a single flower-head at its summit, 
but in favorable situations branches appear from the axils of the 
upper leaves, producing a bushy plant with a spread of two feet. 
The leaves are alternate, with petioles one to three inches long, 
the blades triangular-ovate and rather firm in texture. While the 
largest leaf-blades are four to six inches long by half as wide, the 
upper are gradually reduced in size, are narrower in relative width, 
and have shorter petioles; they are rough on both sides, three- 
nerved, sharply and irregularly serrate at the margin, sharply 
acuminate at the apex, and rather abruptly narrowed into an obtuse 
or broadly acute base. The upper portion of the main stem, six 
to ten inches in length, and of each of its branches, is leafless, 
becomes gradually thicker toward the summit, and terminates in a 
flower-head. Each head is subtended by a saucer-shaped or de- 
pressed-hemispheric involucre composed of a number of lanceolate 
scales. The disk is an inch or more in diameter, purple-brown, and 
hemispheric or conic. The disk-flowers are almost concealed among 
the long sharp-pointed projecting scales of the receptacle. The 
ray-flowers are twelve to twenty in number, red-purple, two to two 
and one half inches long, and conspicuously drooping. The ray- 
flowers are neutral, and fall after flowering, while each disk-flower 
ripens a thick four-sided achene with a short crown-like pappus. 

The purple cone-flower is distinctly a woodland species and is 
widely distributed through the forested region of the central states 
from Pennsylvania to Michigan, Georgia, and I^ouisiana. West of 
this region, it is replaced by Echinacea pallida in the prairie region, 
and by Echinacea angustifolia on the plains; Echinacea tennesseensis 
occurs in Tennessee and Arkansas. These three agree with Echin- 
acea purpurea in their red-purple flowers, while the fifth species of 
the genus, Echinacea paradoxa of southwestern Missouri, has 
yellow rays. 

Of the four species with red-purple flowers, Echinacea purpurea 
is by far the most attractive in its native haunts and most worthy 



68 Addisonia 

of cultivation. It appears to best advantage at the edge of the 
forest, where it receives plenty of sun and still enjoys the protection 
of the trees. Here it grows tall, branches freely, and produces a 
correspondingly larger number of its showy heads. Its coarse 
foliage and stiff heads make it poorly adapted for the small garden, 
but it can be used to advantage against a background of shrubbery 
in large plantings. In the latitude of New York the flowers appear 
in July and August. 

Specimens of this plant are growing in the collections of the New 
York Botanical Garden, and it was from one of these that our 
illustration was drawn. 

H. A. Gleason. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. l. — Flowering stem. Fig. 2. — Lower leaf. 
Fig. 3. — Disk-flower and scale, side view, X 3. Fig. 4. — Disk-flower, X 3. 



PLATE 115 



ADDISONIA 



/ I 




"L.l:d^^ 



LANTANA DEPRESSA 



Addisonia 69 

(Plate 115) 

LANTANA DEPRESSA 
Pineland Lantana 

Native of southern Florida 
Family Verb^naceas Vervain FamUy 

Lantana depressa Small, Bull. N. Y. Bot. Gard. 3: 436. 1905. 

A shrub, with numerous diffuse or prostrate branches three feet 
long or less, from a stout woody root. The branches are somewhat 
angled, finely, often sparingly, pubescent, and unarmed. The leaves 
are opposite, usually numerous, bright green, mostly one to two 
inches long ; the blades are ovate to elliptic, acute or obtuse, serrate 
to crenate-serrate, sparingly fine-pubescent on both sides, more or 
less shining and with impressed veins above, dull and with prominent 
veins beneath, and tapering, cuneate, or rounded at the base. 
The flowers are borne in bracted involucrate clusters about an 
inch in diameter, terminating minutely hairy peduncles which 
usually exceed their subtending leaves. The bracts are lanceolate 
to linear-lanceolate, minutely pubescent, and imbricate on the ovoid 
or ellipsoid receptacle-like rachis. The calyx is campanulate, about 
a twelfth of an inch long, two-lobed, usually about one half as long 
as the subtending bract, minutely pubescent and ciliolate. The 
corolla is deep yellow or bright orange, a half inch long or less, 
with the finely pubescent tube slightly dilated upward and often 
a little curved. The hmb is obHque, with a reniform upper lip 
and a three-lobed lower lip, which has a broad, often reniform, 
middle lobe about twice as large as the lateral lobes. The four 
stamens are minute, borne in pairs about the middle of the corolla, 
the posterior pair further down on the corolla-tube than the anterior. 
The anthers are subglobose and more or less didymous, nearly or 
quite as long as the free part of the filament. The ovary is ovoid 
or ellipsoid, sessile, and tipped with a slender columnar style which 
exceeds the ovary in length. The stigma is very oblique. The 
drupes are clustered, subglobose, black or purple-black, shining, 
about one sixth of an inch in diameter, and tardily deciduous from 
the thickened receptacle-like rachis. 

One of the more conspicuous shrubs of the Everglade Keys at 
nearly all seasons of the year is the plant here illustrated. 

The genus Lantana contains about fifty species. They are most 
abundant in tropical and subtropical America; there are a few in 
Africa and Asia. The plants range in habit from erect shrubs to 
those with creeping stems; some are even vine-like. The flowers 
range from white to various shades of several colors. Sometimes 
several colors are represented on one plant. 



70 Addisonia 

The species here illustrated seems not to have been observed 
until 1903. It has a stout, frequently knob-like root, which is 
often seated in or nearly enclosed in a cavity of the honeycombed 
limestone on which the plant grows. From this root dozens of 
stems spring and spread radially on the ground. Single plants thus 
form mats on the rocky pineland floor, varying from two to six 
feet in diameter. When covered with myriads of golden-yellow 
flowers, as they are nearly if not quite throughout the year, these 
mats form the most conspicuous floral element of the woods. On 
account of the showy flowers this plant is sometimes grown in 
neighboring gardens as an ornament. 

Unlike the several naturalized species of Lantana in Florida, 
the flowers of this do not vary in color, either on the same individual 
or on difi'erent ones. 

The specimen from which the accompanying illustration was 
made was collected on the reservation of Charles Deering at Cutler, 
Florida, May 5, 1918. 

John K. Smali,. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering stem. Fig. 2. — Flower, X 2. 
Fig. 3. — Flower, cut open, X 2. Fig. 4. — Stamens, X 6. Fig. 5. — Fruit. 



PLATE 116 



ADDISONIA 




ILEX VERTICILLATA 



Addisonia 71 

(Plate 116) 

ILEX VERTICILLATA 
Winterberry 

Native of eastern United States 

Family Aquifouacea© HoIvI^y Family 

Prinos verticillatus L. Sp. PI. 330. 1753. 

Ilex verticillata A. Gray, Man. ed. 2. 264. 1856. 

An Openly branched shrub, not commonly over eight to ten 
feet high but, it is said, exceptionally growing to the stature of a 
small tree; the branching is alternate, the twigs dark brown 
flecked with scattered white lenticels, their younger parts often 
slightly pubescent. The dark green leaves are reticulate-veiny 
and often rugose, and are thicker but less firm than in other nearly 
related species; they are glabrous or somewhat pubescent on the 
upper surface and more or less tomentulose-pubescent beneath, 
especially along the prominent veins; their shape varies from 
lance-oval or broader to oblong-lanceolate, with acute or caudate- 
acuminate apex and narrowed or contracted base; the margins 
are somewhat doubly and unevenly sub-uncinately serrate; the 
blades are one and one half to three and one half inches long and 
half as broad as long; the petioles usually bear some pubescence 
and are one quarter to three quarters of an inch long. The flowers 
are mainly dioecious and are crowded in diminutive axillary cymes 
along the season's branches. The sterile flowers are in number one 
to twelve and are borne on usually glabrous pedicels three sixteenths 
of an inch or less in length, their peduncle usually shorter and 
puberulent; the fertile flowers are one to three on commonly 
puberulent pedicels shorter and less slender than those of the 
sterile flowers, their peduncle almost obsolete; minute brown brac- 
teoles are found at the base of the pedicels. The small calyx-lobes 
are ovate to triangular-ovate or orbicular and are pubescent and 
fringed. The white corolla is rotate, about one quarter of an inch 
across, with four to six oblong blunt lobes spreading and somewhat 
recurved at maturity. The drupes are scarlet and shining and are 
globose, or slightly broader than long, becoming three eighths of an 
inch in diameter; their pulp is yellow and incloses about six oblong, 
three-angled, bony nutlets one quarter to three sixteenths of an 
inch in length. 

Not in any way noteworthy in form or foliage and without dis- 
tinction in its flowering, this shrub has little to mark it for partic- 
ular attention until, in the autumn, its scarlet berry-like drupes 
brighten in the low grounds and thickets that are its home. By 
mid-September the berries, for, non-botanically, such are they 



72 Addisonia 

to the eye, take their first tinge of color and soon thereafter gleam 
among the green leaves like polished coral beads singly or clustered 
in the short intervals along the branches between leaf and leaf. 
The leaves themselves at no time show any bright tints of autumn 
coloring. Nor do they persist late in the season but, falling away, 
leave the fruit in beaded wands to glow in frozen swamp and gray 
thicket well into the winter, the name " winterberry " needing no 
interpreter. Of less obvious application, the name "black alder" 
is said to have reference to the dark color of the older bark. 

This is a shrub of friendly habit with other low-ground woody 
species of like stature and is not disposed to take so close a growth 
as to preclude a mixed association with its companions. Among 
them its flowers make no display and have only a brief season in 
late June and early July. 

The distribution of this species is from Connecticut to Florida 
and northward in the interior from Missouri to Wisconsin and 
Ontario. Eastward and northward it gives place to another winter- 
berry, Ilex hronxensis, not widely dissimilar in aspect but of distinct 
attributes. A derivative of this, the Nantucket winterberry. 
Ilex fastigiata, having smaller and narrower leaves and crowded 
erect branches, is abundant on Nantucket, and is almost insular 
in its habitat, occurring elsewhere, as far as known, only locally in 
New Jersey. 

Our plate is from a shrub growing in the Fruticetum of the New 
York Botanical Garden, transplanted from the North Meadow in 
1898. The species is in cultivation, but deserves a wider use in 
planted grounds. White-fruited and yellow-fruited forms have 
been reported. 

E. P. BlCKNKLL. 

Explanation op Plate. Fig. 1. — Fruiting branch. Fig. 2. — Flowering 
branch. Fig. 3. — Flower, X 5. 



PLATE 117 



ADDISONIA 



( 




■lEZcdcrri^ 



VIORNA BALDWINII 



Addisonia 73 

(Plate 117) 
VIORNA BALDWINII 

Pine-hyacinth 

Native of peninsular Florida 

Family Ranunculacea© Crowfoot Family 

Clematis Baldwinii T. & G. Fl. N. Am. 1: 8. 1838. 
Viorna Baldwinii Small, Fl. SE. U. S. 439. 1903. 

A perennial with a cluster of tough-succulent cord-like roots at 
the base of a hard simple or branched caudex. The stems are 
solitary or several together, angled or ultimately channeled, finely 
pubescent, at least when young, sparingly leafy, and simple or in 
the case of robust plants sometimes somewhat branched. The 
leaves are opposite, in few pairs, distant or sometimes approximate 
" on the branches. The blades are various, either entire throughout 
the plant or entire on the lower part of the stem and lobed above; 
those of the lower leaves relatively shorter and broader than those 
of the upper, ovate, oval, elliptic, or lanceolate, half an inch to two 
inches long, obtuse or mucronate ; those of the upper ones lanceolate, 
elliptic-lanceolate, or linear, or palmately or pinnately lobed and 
with narrow divisions ; all of them more or less pubescent beneath, 
at least when young, or sometimes glabrous, sparingly veined with 
the veins united in intramarginal loops, and sessile or with short 
margined petioles. The pedicels or flower-stalks are elongate, 
erect, similar to the stem but more slender and more pubescent, 
usually copiously pubescent below the flower, the hairs white or 
whitish, short, crisped. The flower is solitary at the end of each 
pedicel, nodding. The calyx is campanulate, about an inch long, 
deep lavender and shining without, pale-lavender or whitish within, 
more or less swollen at the base; the sepals are sometimes faintly 
lined, with the spreading or recurved margins thin and crisped, 
often sparingly pubescent without, tomentulose within in a line 
along the margins. The corolla is wanting. The stamens are 
numerous, erect, borne on a receptacle just within the whorl of 
sepals'; the filaments are filiform, but slightly flattened, sparingly 
villous except near the base; the anthers are linear, glabrous, 
decidedly shorter than the filaments, abruptly and minutely tipped 
at the apex. The carpels are numerous, crowded on a hemispheric 
receptacle, elongate; the ovary is ovoid and densely clothed with 
long sliky appressed hairs ; the style is filiform, densely clothed with 
and hidden in the long silky hairs which are loosely appressed on 
the lower part and closely appressed on the upper. The stigma is 
introrse, slightly recurved at the apex. The achenes are borne in 
an erect plume-like head; their bodies are ovoid, fully one sixth 
of an inch wide, loosely appressed-pubescent, brown, each terminat- 



74 Addisonia 

ing in the slenderly elongated style which is conspicuously plumose 
by lax sordid hairs. 

The clematis-relative here described and figured represents one 
of the more interesting plants discovered during a period of explora- 
tion in Florida subsequent to that represented by the Bartrams. 
It was apparently first detected by WiUiam Baldwin, a surgeon in 
the United States Navy, about the end of the first decade of the 
last centur}^ perhaps shortly before he was recalled to active 
service in the war of 1812 with Great Britain. It seems strange 
that Bartram did not observe this plant or at least mention it in 
his "Travels" if he had met with it in the field, and it is still 
stranger that Baldwin, who did collect it, did not refer to it in his 
published letters,* for, if it is not a conspicuous plant with a showy 
flower, it is at least attractive, and unique in the flora of Florida. 

Either in flower or in fruit this plant attracts the eye. In flower 
the nodding bell-shaped bright flowers are different from those 
of any of the associated plants. The calyx resembles a large hya- 
cinth flower, whence, in connection with the plant's habitat, namely 
the pinewoods, the popular name, pine-hyacinth. In fruit it 
attracts attention by the plumes made up of the numerous long 
curled hairy tails of the achenes. 

By means of a stout caudex and numerous tough roots the pine- 
hyacinth is able to survive repeated forest fires. These, occurring 
frequently, sometimes almost annually, apparently rather stimulate 
the plant which, burned off at the surface of the ground, quickly 
starts afresh and sends up new flowering stems with decided vigor. 
The forest fires, occurring at different seasons in both neighboring 
and distant regions, thus prolong the flowering season of the pine- 
hyacinth throughout the year. Individuals planted or growing 
naturally in some protected area only, would give the clue to the 
normal flowering season of this species. 

The specimens from which the accompanying plate was made 
were collected by the writer in pinelands bordering the Everglades 
along the Tamiami Trail several miles west of Miami, Florida, in 
May, 1918. 

John K. Smai^i,. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering stem. Fig. 2. — Fruit. 
*Reliquiae Baldwinianae. 



PLATE 118 



ADDISONIA 





< 



'^ 








^ 



1 



e.Eafe 



07l_ 






JUSSIAEA PERUVIANA 



Addisonia 75 

(Platens) 
JUSSIAEA PERUVIANA 

Marsh Evening-primrose 

Native from peninsular Florida to South America 
Family Onagraceae Evening-primrose Family 

Jussiaea peruviana L. Sp. PI. 388. 1753. 

A perennial plant, partly woody, the stems fourteen feet tall or 
less, widely branched, hirsute, with a reddish or brown bark which 
comes off as shreds on the stems and older branches. The leaves 
are alternate, numerous, and deep-green. The blades are thick- 
herbaceous, ovate, oval, elliptic, lanceolate, or elliptic-lanceolate, 
mostly two to four inches long, or longer, acute or somewhat 
acuminate, or sometimes obtuse, more or less acuminate at the 
base, short-petioled or those near the ends of the branches sessile 
or nearly so, more or less pubescent, sometimes sparingly, at other 
times quite copiously, but always with fewer hairs above than 
beneath; they are entire, and with numerous upwardly curved 
lateral veins which are particularly prominent beneath and unite 
to form an intramarginal vein. The flowers are solitary at the ends 
of short, naked, axillary branches, subtended by a pair of bracts 
which are usually deciduous in anthesis or soon after. The bracts 
are narrowly elliptic to elliptic-lanceolate, and acuminate. The 
hypanthium is turbinate in anthesis and closely fine-pubescent. 
The four persistent sepals are lanceolate or ovate-lanceolate, one 
third to two thirds of an inch long, acuminate, ciliate, pubescent 
with short and long hairs without and glabrous within. The corolla 
is bright yellow, showy, two to two and a half inches wide. The 
four petals are very broad, the blades varying from suborbicular to 
orbicular-reniform, more or less notched at the apex, entire, short- 
clawed, pinnately veined. The stamens are usually eight in number, 
borne on the edge of the hypanthium and surrounding a stylo- 
podium. The filaments are subulate, alternately shorter and slender 
and longer and stout. The anthers are narrowly ellipsoid, as long 
as the filaments or slightly shorter. The ovary is inferior and with 
the top covered by the stylopodium. The style is short and stout, 
urceolate, usually with a wider top than base. The stigma is ovoid 
and four-lobed. The capsules are oblong-pyramidal or pyramidal- 
obovoid, one half to three quarters of an inch long, topped with the 
somewhat accrescent stylopodium, crowned with the persistent 
sepals, 4-ribbed, the sides pubescent, more copiously so about the 
ribs, along which they usually rupture. The seeds are very numer- 
ous, obliquely ellipsoid, about one twenty-fourth of an inch long, 
yellowish, shining. 

As modern civilization advanced into Florida, botanical explora- 



76 Addisonia 

tion was taken up, following several natural stages: first the pine- 
lands, then the hammocks were investigated, and later the wet parts 
of the country, the marshes and the swamps, received some atten- 
tion. The plant under consideration, an inhabitant of swamps and 
marshes, did not appear in botanical literature of the United States 
until the last quarter of the nineteenth century. It was discovered 
in Florida, almost simultaneously, at the western side of the 
peninsula and on the eastern, along the shores of two rivers which 
have become permanently and prominently associated with the 
botanical history of North America, namely the Caloosahatchie 
and the Miami. 

In Florida Jussiaea peruviana is now known to range from the 
lake region to the southern end of the peninsula. It thrives only 
in alluvial soil, consequently it does not occur on the Florida Keys 
where alluvium is absent. Outside of Florida it has a very exten- 
sive geographic range, extending through the West Indies and 
continental tropical America to the southern part of South America. 
Throughout this wide range the plants show but slight variation in 
characters. This fact is noteworthy when we consider that south 
of Florida this species has also considerable altitudinal range, 
commonly occurring at five to six thousand feet elevation in moun- 
tainous regions. 

This plant was discovered near Lima, Peru, about the beginning 
of the eighteenth century. In that region it enjoyed considerable 
repute among the Indians as a remedy for various diseases. Its 
reputed medicinal quahties do not seem to have been discovered 
by the Seminole Indians in Florida, although they have lived in 
the midst of the plant for generations. 

This evening-primrose is one of our giant herbs. Although it 
cannot compete with the "careless" {Acnida australis) in the 
massiveness of its stem, it nearly or quite equals it in height. The 
numerous large flowers with their bright yellow corollas which 
expand during the evening, night and early morning are in strong 
contrast to the deep-green foliage of the plant. 

The specimens from which the accompanying plate was made 

were collected in May, 1918, by the writer, in the Everglades near 

the source of the west branch of the Miami River; this stream 

once arose there as a rapids flowing over the rocky rim of the 

Everglades, at one time a picturesque landmark but totally 

destroyed during the past few years. 

John K. Small. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. 1. — Flowering stem. Fig. 2. — Fruit, immature. 



PLATE 119 



ADDISONIA 




SALVIA FARINACEA 



Addisonia 77 

(Plate 119) 
SALVIA FARINACEA 
Gray Salvia 

Native of Texas and New Mexico and adjacent Mexico 
Family Lamia cbab Mint Family 

Salvia farinacea Benth, Lab. Gen. & Sp. 274. 1833. 

A perennial plant two to three feet tall, with mealy blue or pale 
blue calyxes, and violet or purple corollas. The pubendent stems are 
usually branched. The leaves are opposite, but often, by the 
development of short leafy branches in their axils, appearing as if 
in clusters. The blades, commonly on slender petioles less than 
an inch long, vary considerably in shape, ranging from linear- 
lanceolate to ovate, but more frequently of the narrower types, and 
are up to three inches long and an inch and a quarter wide, but 
usually less than an inch wide; the surfaces are more or less 
pubescent, and the margins entire, undulate or serrate. The 
flowers, in racemes up to ten inches long on long naked stalks, are 
in rather close whorls of a dozen or more. The calyx is three 
sixteenths to a quarter of an inch long and tubular-bell-shaped, 
has prominent nerves, and is at first of a steel blue, fading paler; 
it is covered with a white pubescence which gives it a mealy appear- 
ance. The corolla is violet or purple, up to five eighths of an inch 
long, pubescent externally, two-lipped; the upper lip is hooded, 
erect, about half as long as the four-lobed spreading lower lip. 

As a perennial plant this has not proven hardy at the New York 
Botanical Garden, but as a hardy annual it has been very successful. 
Self-sown seeds germinate freely in the spring, giving an abundance 
of seedlings which require vigorous thinning out. Its deep-colored 
corollas in contrast with the calyxes and gray fohage give it a strik- 
ing appearance, and make it a valued addition to the gray border. 
The species has been in the collections of the New York Botanical 
Garden since 1915, and it is from plants from self-sown seed that 
the drawing has been prepared. 

The genus Salvia, comprising over five hundred species widely 
distributed in temperate and tropical regions, has furnished many 
plants of horticultural value, there being more than fifty now 
in cultivation in this country. One of the commonest of these, 
both in the border and as a bedding plant, is the scarlet sage. Salvia 
splendens, a native of Brazil; its blazing color is conspicuous up 
to the time of frost. Another species, of widely different appear- 
ance, is Salvia argentea, the fohage densely covered with long silvery 



78 Addisonia 

hairs; unfortunately, however, it is a biennial. A plant of economic 
importance is Salvia officinalis, the common sage, the leaves of 
which are used for flavoring. 

George V. Nash. 

Explanation of Plate. Fig. l. — Flowering stem. Fig. 2. — Flower, cut 
open, X 2. Fig. 3. — Stamens, front view, X 2. Fig. 4. — Stamens, side view, X 2. 
Fig. 5.— Style, X 2. 



PLATE 120 



ADDISONIA 




DIANTHERA CRASSIFOLIA 



Addisonia 79 

(Plate 120) 
DIANTHERA CRASSIFOLIA 
Florida Water-willow 

Native of Florida 
Family Acanthaceab Acanthus Family 

Dianthera crassifolia Chapm. Fl. S. U. S. 304. 1860. 

A perennial plant, with horizontal, often branched, succulent, 
nodose rootstocks. The stems are solitary, tufted or gregarious, 
four to sixteen inches tall, sometimes branched at the base, succulent 
and glabrous. The leaves are opposite, quite various; those of the 
lowest pair have orbicular, oval, ovate, or obovate blades, those on 
the lower part of the stem, spatulate to linear-spatulate, those on the 
upper part of the stem, linear-lanceolate to linear, often narrowly 
so, or sometimes all narrowly linear above the lowest pair or two; 
all gradually or abruptly narrowed into short and stout petioles. 
The blades are entire but often wavy-margined, or sometimes 
obscurely toothed. The flowers are borne in long-peduncled elon- 
gate virgate spike-Hke panicles, each subtended by an involucre-like 
group of bracts. The calyx is green, usually a quarter to a half 
inch long, with linear acuminate lobes which stand erect or nearly so. 
The corolla is rose-purple, except for some paler figuring in the 
throat and on the lower lip, and the base of the tube, which is 
green or sometimes pink or nearly white; it is three quarters of an 
inch to one inch long, the tube very short and somewhat swollen; 
the limb consists of a narrow upper lip, reflexed and two-lobed at 
the apex, and a very broad spreading three-lobed lower lip with the 
middle lobe slightly notched at the apex and the somewhat narrower 
lateral lobes entire. The filaments and anther-connective are pale. 
The anther-sacs are dark brown, one twelfth to one eighth of an 
inch long. The ovary is conic and terminated by a filiform style, 
with obtuse stigmas. The capsule is about one inch long or less, 
with an ellipsoid body which terminates a stipe-like base of about 
equal length. The seeds are orbicular, flat, and about one sixth 
of an inch in diameter. 

In the northern states many are well acquainted with the water- 
willow, Dianthera americana, which grows in often extensive patches 
or large areas on flat shores or about islands. The stems are often 
partly submerged. That plant is relatively large but its flowers 
are rather inconspicuous. 

In the southern states there are several smaller water-wUlows, 
but their flowers, although mostly white, are much more con- 
spicuous than those of the northern plant. However, the most 
showy of all is the one here illustrated. It is an inhabitant of 



80 Addisonia 

Florida, and is particulariy abundant in the Everglade region of 
that state. In the Everglades and adjacent marshes it often grows 
in vast patches, and in the morning the bright-colored corollas are 
exceedingly conspicuous. 

This plant was discovered in middle Florida about the middle of 
the last century, by A. W. Chapman, who first described it in 1860. 
It was recorded as growing in wet pine barrens at the original 
locality. Since the early collections were made it has been found 
to inhabit prairies, hammocks, and particularly the Everglades. 
Outside of the Everglades it grows in either sand or clay, but in the 
Everglades it often grows in almost pure decayed vegetable matter. 
There its rootstocks, enclosed in the wet spongy mass of humus, 
absorb moisttu-e and nutriment sufficient to produce a more luxur- 
iant growth than I have seen elsewhere. Sometimes acres are 
covered with a growth of this showy water-willow, almost to the 
exclusion of other vegetation. 

The specimen from which the accompanying illustration was 
made was collected in the Everglades along the Tamiami Trail, 
April 28, 1918, by the writer. 

John K. Smai.l. 

Explanation OP Pi^TE. Fig. 1. — Flowering stem. Fig. 2. — Flower. Fig. 3- 
—Flower, cut open, X 2j^. Fig. 4.— Fruit. 



Addisonia 



81 



INDEX 



Bold-face type is used for the Latin names of plants illustrated; smai^l 
CAPITALS for Latin names of families illustrated and for the names of the authors 
of the text; italics for other Latin names, including synonyms. 



AcANTHACEAE: Dianthera crassifolia, 

pi. 120 
Acanthus family, 79 
Acnida australis, 76 
Apple family, 1, 21, 33 
Aquifoliaceae: Ilex serrate arguti- 
dens, pi. 106; Ilex verticillata, pi. 116 
Aronla, 1 

arbutifolia, 33, plate 97 

arbutifolia, 1 

atropurpm-ea, 1, plate 81 

atropurpurea, 33 

melanocarpa, 2 
Aster, 

New England, 3 

Smooth, 47 
Aster 

laevis, 47, plate 104 

Novae-Angliae, 3, plate 82 

Benthamia, 18 

BiCKNELL,, Eugene Pintard: Aster 

laevis, 47; Ilex verticillata, 71 
Black Haw, 59 

BOYNTON, ElENNETH ROWLAND: Heli- 

anihus orgyalis, 25; Lepadena mar- 
ginata, 1 1 ; Stylophorum diphyllum, 3 1 

Brauneria purpurea, 67 

Britton, Nathaniel Lord: Aronia 
aibutifolia, 33; Aronia atropurpurea, 
1; Opuntia lasiacantha, 19; Opuntia 
Opuntia, 49 

Buck-brush, 61 

Buergeria floribunda, 13 

CactacEAE: Gymnocalycium Mostii. 
pi. 83 B; Gymnocalycium multiflorum, 
pl. 83 A; Opuntia lasiacantha, pi. 90; 
Opuntia Opuntia, pl. 105 

Cactus 

humifusus, 49 



Cactus Opuntia, 49 

Opuntia nana, 49 
Cactus family, 5, 19, 49 
Callicarpa, Japanese, 45 
CalUcarpa, 45 
americana, 45 
japonica, 45, plate 103 
Caprifoliaceae: Symphoricarpos al- 
bus laevigatus, pl. 94; Symphoricar- 
pos Symphoricarpos, pl. Ill; Vi- 
burnum prunifolium, pl. 110 
Carduaceae: Aster laevis, pl. 104; 
Aster Novae-Angliae, pl. 82; Coreop- 
sis Leavenworthii, pl. 113; Echinacea 
purpurea, pl. 114; Helianthus orgy- 
alis, pl. 93; Othonna crassifolia, pl. 
107; Solidago sguarrosa, pl. 102 
Careless, 76 
Cattleya labiata, 39 
Celandine Poppy, 31 
Celastraceae: Euonymus alata, pl. 

84 
Celastrus 
alatus, 7 
striatus, 7 
Chelidonium 

diphyllum, 31 
majus, 31 
Cherry, ComeHan, 17, 41 
Choke-berry, 

Black-fruited, 2 
Purple-fruited, 1 
Red-fruited, 1, 33 
Cladras'is amurensis Buergeri, 13 
Clematis Baldwinii, 73 
Cone-flower, Purple, 67 
Coral-berry, 61 
Coreopsis, 25, 65 

Leavenworthii, 65, plate 113 
CornaceaE: Cornus Mas, pl. 101; 
Coruns officinalis, pl. 89 



82 



Addisonia 



Cornelian Cherry, 17, 41 
Comus, 17 

Mas, 41, plaU 101 

Mas, 17 

officinalis, 17, plate 89 

officinalis, 41 
Cotoneaster, Simons', 21 
Cotoneaster, 21 

Simonsii, 21, plate 91 
Cotyledon nodulosa, 23 
Crassula, Tree, 57 
Crassula, 57 

portiUacea, 57, plate 109 
Crassula CEAE: Crassula portulacea, 

pi. 109; Edieveria nodidosa, pi. 92 
Crowfoot family, 73 
Cynoxylon, 18 

Date-plum, 10 
Dianthera 

americana, 79 

crassifolia, 79, plate 120 
Dichrophyllum marginatum, 11 
Diospyros 

concolor, 9 

pubescens, 9 

virginiana, 9, plate 85 
Discocarpus, 6 

Dogwood, Japanese Early, 17 
Dogwood family, 17, 41 

Ebenaceae: Diospyros virginiana, pi. 

85 
Ebony family, 9 
Echeveria, Red-margined, 23 
Echeveria, 23 

nodulosa, 23, plate 92 
Echinacea 

angustifolia, 67 

pallida, 67 

paradoxa, 67 

purpurea, 67, plate 114 

tennesseensis, 67 
Echinocactus 

Mostii, 5 

multiflorus, 5 
Euonymus, Winged, 7 
Euonymus, 8 

alata, 7, plate 84 

Thunbergiana, 7 



Euphorbia 

leucoloma, 11 

marginata, 11 
Euphorbia CEAE: Lepadena margin- 
ata, pi. 86 
Evening-primrose, Marsh, 75 
Evening-primrose family, 75 

Fabaceae: Maackia amurensis Buer- 

geri. pi. 87 
Fire-on-the-mountain, 12 

Gesneria family, 29 

Gesneriaceae: Sinningia speciosa, pi. 

95 
Gleason, Henry Allan: Echinacea 

purpurea, 67 
Gloxinia 

maculata, 29 

speciosa, 29 
Goldenrod, Ragged, 43 
Gymnocalycium, 

Many-flowered, 5 

Most's, 5 
Gymnocalycium, 6 

Mostii, 5, plate 83 B 

multiflorum, 5, plate 83 A 

Hamamelidaceae: Hamamelis japon- 

ica, pi. 98 
Hamamelis, 36 

arborea, 35, 36 

japonica, 35, plate 98 

japonica arborea, 36 

mollis, 36 

vernalis, 36 

virginiana, 35, 36 
Haw, Black, 59 

Helianthus orgyalis, 25, plate 93 
Heliotropium Leavenworthii, 66 
Hibiscus 

Moscheutoj, 37, plate 99 

Moscheutos, 16 

Moscheutos albus, 15 

oculiroseus, 15, plate 88 

opulif alius, 37 

palustris, 37 
HoLLicK, Charles Arthur: Astr 
Novae-Angliae, 3 



Addisonia 



83 



Holly family, 51, 71 
Honeysuckle family, 27, 59, 61 
Hylomecon, 31 

Hex, 51 

argutidens, 51 

bronxensis, 72 

crenata, 51 

fastigiata, 72 

glabra, 51 

opaca, 51 

serrata argutidens, 51, plate 106 

verticillata, 71, plate 116 

Jussiaea peruviana, 75, plate 118 

Lamia CEAE: Salvia farinacea. pi 119 
Lantana, Pineland, 69 
Lantana, 69 

depressa, 69, plate 115 
Lepadena 

leucoloma, 11 

marginata, 11, plate 86 
Ligeria, Maximilian's, 29 
Ligeria Maximiliana, 29, 30 
Lonicera Symphoricarpos, 61 

Maackia, 14 

amurensis, 14 

amurensis Buergeri, 13, plate 87 

Tashiroi, 14 
Magnolia, Thurber's, 55 
Magnolia, 55 

grandiflora, 56 

Kobus, 55, plate 108 

Thu beri, 55 

virginiana, 56 
Magnolia family, 55 
Magnolia ceaE: Magnolia Kobus, pi. 

108 
Mai,aceaE: Aronia arbutifolia, pi. 97; 
Aronia atropurpurea, pi. 81; Coton- 
easter Simonsii, pi. 91 
Malacocarpus, 6 
Mallow, Crimson-eye, 15 
Mallow family, 15, 37 
Malvaceae: Hibiscus Moscheutos, pi. 

99; Hibiscus oculiroseus, pi. 88 
Meconopsis diphylla, 3 1 



Mespilus 

arbutifolia, 33 

arbutifolia erythrocarpa, 33 
Mint family, 77 

Nash, George Valentine: Calli- 
carpa japonica, 45; Cornus Mas, 41; 
Cornus officinalis, 17; Cotoneaster 
Simonsii, 21; Crassula portulacea, 57; 
Euonymus alata, 7 ; Hamamelis jap- 
onica, 35; Ilex serrata argutidens, 51; 
Maackia amurensis Buergeri, 13; 
Magnolia Kobus, 55; Othonna cras- 
sifolia, 53; Salvia farinacea, 77; So- 
bralia sessilis, 39; Spiraea Thun- 
bergii, 63; Symphoricarpos albus lae- 
vigatus, 27 

OnagraceaE: Jussiaea peruviana, pi, 

118 
Optmtia 

cespitosa, 49 

chaetocarpa, 19 

humifusa, 49 

intermedia, 49 

lasiacantha, 19, plate 90 

megacantha, 20 

megacantha lasiacantha, 19 

mesacantha, 49 

nana, 49, 50 

Opimtia, 49, plate 105 

Rafinesquei, 49 

Rafinesquiana, 49 

vulgaris, 49, 50 

vulgaris Rafinesquei, 49 
Orchid family, 39 

OrchidaceaE: Sobralia sessilis, pi. 100 
Orpine family, 23, 57 
Othonna, Thick-leaved, 53 
Othonna crassifolia, 53, plate 107 

PapaveRACEaE: Stylophorum diphyl- 
lum, pi. 96 

Pea family, 13 

Pear, Prickly, 19, 49 

Pennell, Francis WHirriER: Sym- 
phoricarpos Symphoricarpos, 61 

Persimmon, 9 

Pine-hyacinth, 73 



84 



Addisonia 



Poinsettia heterophylla, 12 
Poppy, Celandine, 31 
Poppy family, 31 
Possum- wood, 10 
Prickly Pear, 

Eastern, 49 

Slender White-spined, 19 
Prinos verticiUatus, 7 1 
Pyrus 

arhutifolia, 33 

arbutifolia atropurpurea, 1 

atropurpuna, 1 

RANUNCUI.ACEAE: Vioma Baldwinii, 

pi. 117 
RosACEAE: Spiraea Thunbergii, pi. 112 
Rose family, 63 
Rose, Joseph Nelson: Echeveria nod- 

ulosa, 23; Cymnocalycium Mostii, 5; 

Cymnocalycium muUiflorunt, 5; Sin- 

ningia spec osa, 29 
Rose-Mallow, 

Crimson-eye, 15 
Swamp, 37 
Rudbeckia purpurea, 67 
RusBY, Henry Htmo: Viburnum pru- 

nifolium, 59 

Sage, 

Common, 78 
Scarlet, 77 
Salvia, Gray, 77 
Salvia, 77 

argentea, 77 

farinacea, 77, plate 119 
officinalis, 78 
splendens, 77 
Simmon, 10 
Sinningia, 29 

speciosa, 29, plate 95 
Small, John Kunkel: Coreopsis 
Leavenworthii, 65; Dianthera crassi- 
folia, 79; Diospyros virginiana, 9; 
Jussiaea peruviana, 75; Lantana de- 
pressa, 69; Solidago squarrosa, 43; 
Vioma Baldwinii, 73 
Snowberry, 27, 62 
Snow-on-the-monntain, 11 



Sobralia, Sessile- flowered, 39 
Sobralia, 39 

macrantha, 39 

sessilis, 39, plate 100 
Solidago 

confertiflora, 43 

squarrosa, 43, plate 102 
Spiraea, Thunberg's, 63 
Spiraea, 64 

crenata, 63, 64 

Thunbergii, 63, plate 112 
Spurge family, 11 
Staff-tree family, 7 

Stout, Arlow Burdette: Hibiscus 
Moscheutos, 37; Hibiscus oculiroseus, 
15 
Stylophorum, 31 

diphyllimi, 31, plate 96 
Sunflower, Linear-leaved, 25 
Symphoricarpos, 27 

albus laevigatus, 27, plate 94 

orbiculatus, 61 

racemosus laevigatus, 27 

Symphoricarpos, 61, plate 111 

vulgaris, 61 

Thistle family, 3, 25, 43, 47, 53, 65, 67 
Tickseed, Leavenworth's, 65 
T'Karchay, 57 
Tree Grassula, 57 
Tuna, 19 

Verbena CEAE: Callicarpa japonica, 

pi. 103; Lantana depressa, pi. 115 
Vervain family, 45, 69 
Viburnum pnmifollum, 59, plate 110 
Vioma Baldwinii, 73, plate 117 

Water-willow, 79 

Florida, 79 
Winterberry, 71 

Japanese Sharp-toothed, 5 1 

Nantucket, 72 
Witch-hazel, Japanese, 35 
Witch-hazel family, 35 

Yellow-wood, Japanese, 13 



FORMER PLATES 



PLATE 


1. 


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2. 


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3. 


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PLATE 


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PLATE 


9. 


PLATE 10. 


PLATE 


11. 


PLATE 


12. 


PLATE 


13. 


PLATE 


14. 


PLATE 


15. 


PLATE 


16. 


PLATE 


17. 


PLATE 


18. 


PLATE 


19. 


PLATE 


20, 


PLATE 


21. 


PLATE 


22. 


PLATE 


.23. 


PLATE 


24. 


PLATE 


25. 


PLATE 


26. 


PLATE 


27. 


PLATE 


28. 


PLATE 


29. 


PLATE 


30. 


PLATE 


31A, 


PLATE 


31B. 


PLATE 


82. 


PLATE 


33. 


PLATE 


34. 


PLATE 


35. 


PLATE 


36. 


PLATE 


37. 


PLATE 


38. 


PLATE 


39. 


PLATE 


40. 


PLATE 41. 


PLATE 


42. 


PLATE 


43. 


PLATE 


44. 


PLATE 


45. 


PLATE 


46. 


PLATE 


47. 


PLATE 


48, 


PLATE 


49. 


PLATE 


50. 


PLATE 


51. 


PLATE 


52. 


PLATE 


53. 


PLATE 


54. 


PLATE 


55. 


PUTE 


56. 



RHODODENDRON CAROLINIANUM PLATE 57. 

CASSIA POLYPHYLLA PLATE 58. 

ROBINIA KELSEYI PLATE 59. 

PACHYPHYTUM LONGIFOLIUM PLATE 60, 

BEGONIA COWELLII PLATE 61. 

ECHEVERIA SETOSA PLATE 62. 

COLUMNEA GLORIOSA PLATE 63. 

FOUOUIERIA FORMOSA . PLATE 64. 

MAXILLARIA RINGENS PLATE 65. 

NOPALEA AUBERI PLATE 66. 

CRINUM AMERICANUM PLATE 67. 

CLETHRA ALNIFOLIA PLATE 68. 

ECHEVERIA CARNICOLOR PLATE 69. 

MINA LOBATA PLATE 70. 

CLERODENDRON TRICHOTOMUM PLATE 71. 

NOTYLIA SAGITTIFERA PLATE 72. 

EXOGONIUM MICRODACTYLUM PLATE 73. 

VITEX AGNUS-CASTUS PLATE 74. 

OPUNTIA MACRORHIZA PLATE 75. 

COMMEUNA COMMUNIS PLATE 76. 

ADOXA MOSCHATELLINA PLATE 77. 

SISYRINCHIUM BERMUDIANA PLATE 78. 

COLUMNEA HIRTA PLATE 79. 

PEDILANTHUS SMALLII PLATE 80. 

CREMNOPHILA NUTANS PLATE 81. 

PITHECOLOBIUM GUADALUPENSE PLATE 82^ 

ANTHURIUM GRANDIFOLIUM PLATE 83A. 

EPIDENDRUM PALEACEUM PLATE 838. 

BEGONIA WILLIAMSII PLATE 84. 

ONCIDIUM UROPHYLLUM PLATE 85. 

SEDUM DIVERSIFOLIUM PLATE 86. 

SEDUM HUMIFUSUM PLATE 87. 

CATASETUM SCURRA PLATE 88. 

CHIONODOXA LUCILIAE GIGANTEA pLATE 89. 

AGAVE SUBSIMPLEX PLATE 90. 

DASYSTEPHANA PORPHYRIO PLATE 91. 

RHUS HIRTA DISSECTA PLATE 92. 

CYMOPHYLLUS FRASERl PLATE 93. 

OPUNTIA VULGARIS PLATE 94. 

TILLANDSIA SUBLAXA 

ECHEVERIA AUSTRALIS PLATE 95. 

MOLINA TEXANA PLATE 96. 
TRICHOSTERIQMA BCNEDICTOM PLATE 97. 

BENTHAMIA JAPONfCA PLATE 98. 

DIRCAEA MAGNIFICA PLATE 99. 

BUDDLEIA DAVIDI PLATE 100. 

GONGORA TRUNCATA ALBA PLATE 101. 

WERCKLEOCEREUS GLABER PLATE 102. 

DUDLEYA BRANDEGEI PLATE 103. 

ABELIA GRANDIFLORA PLATE 104. 

PEPEROMIA OBTUSIFOLIA PLATE 105. 

SOLIDAGO JUNCEA PLATE 106. 

ECHEVERIA MULTICAULIS PLATE 107. 

CATASETUM VIRIDIFLAVUM PLATE 103. 

SAGITTARIA LATIFOLIA PLATE 109. 

BACCHARIS HALIMIFOLIA PLATE 110. 
XANTHISMA TEXANUM 



SEDUM BOURGAEI 
CIMICIFUGA SIMPLEX 
FEIJOA SELLOWIANA 
ASTER AMETHYSTINUS 
HARRISIA GRACILIS 
EPIDENDRUM OBLONGATUM 
AESCULUS PARVIFLORA 
MICRAMPELIS LOBATA 
BOMAREA EDULIS 
ASTER TATARICUS 
PACHYPHYTUM BRACTEOSUM 
HARRISIA MARTINI 
ONCIDIUM PUBES 
RAPHIOLEPIS UM8ELLATA 
ROSA "SILVER MOON" 
DENDROBIUM ATROVIOLACEUM 
CENTRADENIA FLORIBUNDA 
PIAROPUS AZUREUS 
SOLIDAGO ALTISSIMA 
PENTAPTERYGIUM SERPENS 
FREYLINIA LANCEOLATA 
ANNESLIA TWEEDIEI 
CRASSULA OUADRIFIDA 
ASTER CORDIFOLIUS 
ARONIA ATROPURPUREA 
ASTER NOVAE-ANGLIAE 
GYMNOCALYCIUM MULTIFLORUM 
GYMNOCALYCIUM MOSTII 

EUONYMUS ALATA 

DIOSPYROS VIRQINIANA 

LEPADENA MARGINATA 

MAACKIA AMURENSIS BUERGERI 

HIBISCUS OCULIROSEUS 

CORNUS OFFICINALIS 

OPUNTIA LASIACANTHA 
COTONEASTER SIMONSII 

ECHEVERIA NODULOSA 

HELIANTHUS ORGYALIS 

SYMPHORICARPOS ALBUS 

LAEVIGATUS 
SINNINGIA SPECIOSA 

STYLOPHORUM DIPHYLLUI/ 

ARONIA ARBUTIFOLIA 

HAMAMELIS JAPONICA 

HIBISCUS MOSCHEUTOS 

SOBRALIA SESSILIS 

CORNUS MAS 
SOLIDAGO SOU AR ROSA 
CALLICARPA JAPONICA 
ASTER LAEVIS 
OPUNTIA OPUNTIA 
ILEX SERRATA ARGUTIDEN8 
OTHONNA CRASSIFOLIA 
MAGNOLIA KOBUS 
CRASSULA PORTULACEA 
VIBURNUM PRUNIFOLIUM 



CONTENTS 



PLATE 111. SYMPHORICARPOS SYMPHORICARPOS 

PLATE 112. SPIRAEA THUNBERGII 

PLATE 113. COREOPSIS LEAVENWORTHtl 

PLATE 114. ECHINACEA PURPUREA 

PLATE 115. LANTANA DEPRESSA 

PLATE 116. ILEX VERTICILLATA 

PLATE 117. VIORNA BALDWINII 

PLATE 118. JUSSIAEA PERUVIANA 

PLATE 119. SALVIA FARINACEA 

PLATE 120. DIANTHERA CRASSI FOLIA 



New York Botanical Garden Librar 



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